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Humanities

A humanities course is any subject that covers human beings and their culture.  Subjects may include English, Social Studies and Fine Arts.

ACL501 UNIFIED CERAMICS

Unified clay is a class where students work in partnership with peers with special needs in a cooperative learning environment to make both functional and sculptural forms using a variety of hand-building techniques and the pottery wheel. Students develop ideas and craftsmanship as they design and build work and learn three-dimensional design concepts. (full year – 1 credit) 9, 10, 11 & 12.

ACL661 CERAMICS 1

Students make both functional and sculptural forms using a variety of hand-building techniques. Students develop ideas and craftsmanship, design and build work, and learn three-dimensional design concepts. Studio fee (½ year – ½ credit) 9, 10, 11 & 12.

ACP876 UCONN DRAWING & COMPOSITION (U)

Fine Arts students further develop observational drawing skills, enhance knowledge of basic drawing tools and techniques, and explore the conceptual ideas of image making by emphasizing concepts in composition and organization and creation of volumetric space. Students maintain required sketch-books for personal exploration and idea development. Studio fee, Prerequisite: ADR664 (full year – 1 credit) 10, 11 & 12.

UConn equivalent ART1030: Drawing 1 (3 Credits)

ACY661 CERAMICS 2

Students continue to build upon hand-building techniques and develop skills on the pottery wheel. Students will develop ideas and craftsmanship as they design and build work and learn three-dimensional design concepts to create functional and sculptural forms. Prerequisite: ACL661. Studio fee (full year – 1 credit) 10, 11 & 12.

ACY761 CERAMICS 3

Students continue to develop skills creating sculptural and functional forms on and off the wheel, explore idea development and higher standards of craftsmanship, and conduct required historical and contem-porary research. Prerequisite: ACY661 and instructor permission. Studio fee (full year – 1 credit) 11 & 12.

ACY961 CERAMICS 4

Students focus on independent ideas development, proficiency in technical skills, and research into contemporary and historical ceramic work. Prerequisite: ACY761 and instructor permission. Studio fee (full year – 1 credit) 11 & 12.

ADE975 HONORS SENIOR DESIGN

Fine Arts students continue to explore various printmaking processes and techniques including but not limited to the basics of serigraphy and silk-screening on fabric. Students refine their design skills and explore multimedia and printmaking as a means of expression. Students maintain required sketchbooks for idea development and visual and verbal responses to artwork. Prerequisite: APT875 & ACP875. Studio fee (full year – 1 credit) 12.

ADR601 DRAWING 1

Students learn the basic steps and techniques of drawing from observation, explore a variety of tools and materials, and develop confidence and skill to express visual facts. No drawing experience necessary. Studio fee (½ year – ½ credit) 9, 10, 11 & 12.

ADR661 DRAWING 2

Students will continue to build their skills and techniques of drawing from direct observation, explore a variety of tools and materials, and develop confidence in drawing skills to express visual facts. Students maintain required sketchbooks for personal exploration and idea development. Prerequisite: ADR601. Studio fee (full year – 1 credit) 10, 11 & 12.

ADR664 DRAWING 1 FOUNDATIONS

Beginning Fine Arts students learn the basic steps and techniques of drawing from direct observation, explore a variety of tools and materials, and develop confidence in drawing skills to express visual facts. Students maintain required sketchbooks for personal exploration and idea development. Studio fee (full year – 1 credit) 9, 10, 11 & 12.

ADR864 DRAWING 3

Fine Arts students continue to refine their drawing skills, arrange compositional elements, and develop technical expertise using a variety of media. Students focus on observational drawing of the human figure and its relationship to its environment. Students maintain required sketchbooks. Prerequisite: B in ADR664 or ACP875. Studio fee (full year – 1credit) 11 & 12.

AEP404 ARTS EXPLORATIONS

Students who have a serious interest in the arts will explore drawing, painting and two and three- dimensional design, and a wide variety of media and techniques. Students will begin to develop the foundations that they will continue to build upon in the Fine Arts Program. No art experience required. Studio fee (full year – 1 credit) 9th graders only.

AFP875 DRAWING 3 FIGURE & PORTRAIT

Fine Arts students continue to refine their drawing skills, arrange compositional elements, and develop technical expertise using a variety of media. Students focus on observational drawing of the human figure and its relationship to its environment. Students maintain required sketchbooks. Prerequisite: B in ADR664 or ACP875. Studio fee (full year – 1 credit) 11 & 12.

APA551 UNIFIED ART (.5)

Students learn introductory elements and techniques while exploring a variety of mediums, including but not limited to drawing, painting, mixed media, and sculpture. No art experience required. Studio fee (½ year – ½ credit) 9, 10, 11, & 12.

APT875 HONORS PAINTING 1

Fine Arts students learn a problem-solving approach to color theory, both practical and historical, and develop observational painting skills to describe form and structure. Students explore current and past artists while developing a variety of design and painting techniques. Studio fee – students purchase all personal painting supplies, Prerequisite: ADR664 (full year – 1 credit) 11 & 12.

APT975 HONORS PAINTING 2

Fine Arts students continue to explore color as a means of expressing form and concepts with emphasis on the figure as subject matter. Students study the contributions of painters, past and present, and maintain required sketchbooks for resolving compositions. Studio fee, Prerequisite: B in APT875 (full year – 1 credit) 12.

ASA956 AP STUDIO ART (A)

Students seriously committed to studying visual art and developing a portfolio of individualized artwork for college preparation develop aesthetic understanding through studio projects that stimulate the imagination, encourage creative problem-solving, and refine skills. Students maintain a required sketchbook and submit a required portfolio to the College Board. Studio fee, Prerequisite: Successful completion of two or more advanced art electives and teacher recommendation (full year – 1 credit) 12.

ASA966 AP STUDIO ART 3D

Designed for students seriously committed to studying 3D mediums ( Jewelry, Ceramics, Sculpture) while developing a portfolio of individualized artwork for college preparation. Students develop aesthetic understanding through studio projects that stimulate the imagination, encourage creative problem-solving, and refine skills. Students develop a portfolio concentration theme that focuses on their creative process while maintaining a detailed sketchbook. Students will then submit a required portfolio to the College Board. Studio fee. Prerequisite: Successful completion of two or more advanced 3D art electives and teacher recommendation (full year – 1 credit) 12.

DBA301 BALLET 1

Students learn basic ballet skills through barre warm-ups, center floor exercises, and combinations. Students learn the history, vocabulary, and techniques of the genre. Proper attire is required for class, as well as participation in the end-of-semester showcase. Some dance experience preferred (½ year – ½ credit) 9, 10, 11 & 12.

DBA301 BALLET 2

Students expand on ballet skills through advanced barre warm-ups, center floor exercises, and combi-nations. Students continue to learn the history, vocab-ulary, and techniques of the genre. Proper attire is required for class, as well as participation in the end-of-semester showcase. Prerequisite: Ballet 1 or teacher permission (½ year – ½ credit) 10, 11 & 12.

DCH301 CHOREOGRAPHY 1

Students learn to choreograph in various styles of dance by exploring improvisational movement and different means of inspiration. Students learn the elements of dance and how to manipulate them to choreograph original pieces. Proper attire is required for class, as well as participation in the end-of-semester showcase. Prerequisite: Completion of a dance course (½ year – ½ credit) 10, 11 & 12.

DCH321 CHOREOGRAPHY 2

Students will expand on their knowledge of chore-ography by learning choreographic tools. They will learn how to incorporate props, lighting, costuming, music editing etc. into their dances. Proper attire is required for class, as well as participation in the end-of-semester showcase. Prerequisite: DCH301 (½ year – ½ credit) 10, 11 & 12.

DDC405 DANCE COMPANY

Students serious about the art of dance join this advanced Dance Company. Students practice a variety of genres in this performance class that requires mandatory participation in annual shows, festivals, community events, and various performance opportunities. Proper attire is required for class. Prerequisite: Completion of a dance course and an audition (full year – 1 credit) 10, 11 & 12.

DDR311 ACTING 1

Students explore the fundamental skills and methods of the actor’s art and learn various techniques, theories and skills involved in character development and stage presence. Students read, interpret, develop and perform improvisations, scenes from plays and contemporary monologues (½ year – ½ credit) 9, 10, 11 & 12.

DDR411 ACTING 2

Students advance acting skills and methods and explore various techniques, theories, and skills involved in different acting styles, character development and stage presence. Students read, interpret, develop and perform realistic and nonrealistic scenes from various dramatic periods: Ancient, Elizabethan, Baroque, Modern, Postmodern and Contemporary. Prerequisite: DDR311 (½ year – ½ credit) 10, 11 & 12.

DDR501  UNIFIED THEATER

Students partner with peers with special needs in an active and fun theater-based cooperative learning environment. Students gain valuable experience exploring the fundamental skills and methods of the actor’s process through improv and scripted acting activities, culminating in the production of an in-class play (½ year – ½ credit) 10, 11 & 12. 

DDR511 ACTING 3

Students continue to develop their acting skills through a focus upon scene work, emphasizing active listening, connecting, character creation and development, text analysis and revealing emotional truth. Students have the opportunity to work on several scenes and present them at a high level of preparation. Students become familiar with the audition process, including cold reading. Prerequisite:  DDR411 (½ year – ½ credit) 10, 11 & 12.

DHH301 INTRODUCTION TO HIP HOP (HIP HOP 1)

Students learn basic Hip Hop dance skills through warm-ups, exercises, and combinations. Students learn the history, vocabulary, and techniques of the genre. Proper attire is required for class. (½ year – ½ credit) 9, 10, 11 & 12.

DHH321 ADVANCED HIP HOP (HIP HOP 2)

Students expand Hip Hop dance skills through advanced warm-ups, exercises, and combinations. Students continue to learn the history, vocabulary, and techniques of the genre. Proper attire is required for class, as well as participation in the end-of-semester showcase. Prerequisite: DHH301 or prior dance experience (½ year – ½ P.E. credit) 9,10, 11 & 12.

DIT301 THEATER 1

Students explore the diverse world of theater, from set and costume design to lights and sound; from playwriting to directing (and acting, too). Students develop their own play, beginning with a design concept and culminating with a complete stage treatment. (½ year – ½ credit) 9, 10, 11 & 12.

DJZ301 JAZZ 1

Students learn basic jazz dance skills through warm-ups, exercises, and combinations. Students learn the history, vocabulary, and techniques of the genre. Proper attire is required for class, as well as participation in the end-of-semester showcase. Some dance experience preferred (½ year – ½ credit) 9, 10, 11 & 12.

DJZ321 JAZZ 2

Students expand jazz dance skills through advanced warm-ups, exercises, and combinations. Students continue to learn the history, vocabulary, and techniques of the genre. Proper attire is required for class, as well as participation in the end-of-semester showcase. Prerequisite: Jazz 1 or teacher permission (½ year – ½ credit) 10, 11 & 12.

DMO301 MODERN DANCE 1

Students learn basic modern dance skills through warm-ups, exercises, and combinations. Students learn the history, vocabulary, and techniques of the genre. Proper attire is required for class, as well as partici-pation in the end-of-semester showcase. Some dance experience preferred (½ year – ½ credit) 9, 10, 11 & 12.

DMO321 MODERN DANCE 2

Students will expand on modern dance skills through a variety of more advanced warm ups, exercises, and combinations. This includes the history, vocabulary, and techniques of the genre. Proper attire is required for class, as well as participation in the end-of-semester showcase. Prerequisite: DMO301 (½ year – ½ credit) 10, 11 & 12. 

DTP301 TAP 1

Students learn basic tap dance skills through warm-ups, exercises, and combinations. Students also learn the history, vocabulary, and techniques of the genre. Proper attire is required for class, as well as participation in the end-of-semester showcase. Some dance experience preferred (½ year – ½ credit) 9, 10, 11 & 12.

DTP321 TAP 2

Students expand on tap dance skills through advanced warm-ups, exercises, and combinations. Students continue to learn the history, vocabulary, and techniques of the genre. Proper attire is required for class, as well as participation in the end-of-semester showcase. Prerequisite: Tap 1 or teacher permission (½ year – ½ P.E. credit) 10, 11 & 12.

EAE904 ALIEN ENCOUNTERS

This course seeks to strengthen and develop students’ reading, writing, speaking, listening, and reasoning skills in a curriculum grounded in the science fiction sub-genre of alien encounters. Students will read, view, and write about a variety of texts including classics like The War of the Worlds and films such as 2002’s Signs. “Alien Encounters” examines the theme of contact between humans and aliens and its reflection of society's beliefs, prejudices, and values of the time (Semester - ½ credit) 11, 12.

ECF904 CRIME FICTION

This course is a study of mystery, detective, and crime fiction from the 19th to 21st centuries. Students will examine the sub-genres of crime fiction through the reading of works such as Mystic River, Acceleration, Gone Baby Gone, and No Country for Old Men. Students develop their reading, writing, speaking, and critical thinking skills while engaging with novels, short stories, films, and other media of the crime fiction genre (Semester - ½ credit) 11, 12.

ECT904 CREATION AND TECHNOLOGY

This course explores literature that addresses the ever-emerging advances in technology and science. From The Time Machine to The Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde, humanity’s fascination with advancement and genetics has shaped the literature and film of the 19th, 20th, and 21st centuries. Students develop their reading, writing, speaking, and critical thinking skills while engaging with novels, short stories, films, and other media of the science fiction genre related to creation and technology (Semester - ½ credit) 11, 12.

ECW691 CREATIVE WRITING (ELECTIVE)

Students will express themselves creatively in a variety of genres including poetry, short stories, memoirs, children’s books, drama, essays, etc. Students will explore different elements of writing such as voice, point of view, figurative language, imagery, diction, dialogue and more. Additionally, the class will use pieces of literature as exemplars for writing. Students will be given writing prompts and time in class both to write and share their writing with peers, and to give and receive constructive feedback. Students may take the course more than once for credit. Does not count towards English credit (Semester – ½ humanities elective credit) 10, 11 & 12.

EDL904 DYSTOPIAN LITERATURE

Students study elements of dystopian literature through a wide range of texts including classics like Lord of the Flies, and more modern texts like Uglies, and The Marrow Thieves. Throughout history, authors have used dystopias, narratives showing the imagined downfall of societies, as a way to caution people about issues in society while also encouraging readers to strive for a more perfect world. Students develop their reading, writing, speaking, and critical thinking skills while engaging with novels, short stories, films, and other media of the dystopian genre (Semester - ½ credit) 11, 12.

EEN004 ENGLISH 1

Students develop their ability to recognize and write well-constructed English sentences and paragraphs and to speak effectively. Additionally, vocabulary study and reading literary classics encourage growth of reading fluency and comprehension. Students learn the basics of the research paper (full year – 1 credit).

EEN005 HONORS ENGLISH 1

At an in-depth and accelerated pace, students develop their ability to recognize and write well-constructed English sentences and paragraphs and to speak effectively. Additionally, vocabulary study and reading literary classics encourage growth of reading fluency and comprehension. Recommended for highly motivated students whose middle school indicate a level of proficiency in critical reading and writing skills to be successful in grade 9 honors-level coursework (full year – 1 credit).

EEN404 ENGLISH 2

Students read and respond to short stories, poetry, speeches, and novels written by American authors, and practice reading, writing, and research skills through daily and long-term assignments (full year – 1 credit) 10.

EEN485 HONORS ENGLISH 2

Students cover the EEN404 curriculum at a more advanced pace and depth. EEN485 focuses heavily on academic writing and literary analysis and is designed to prepare students for future honors, AP, and college-level courses. Prerequisite: teacher recommendation (full year – 1 credit) 10.

EEN785 HONORS BRITISH LITERATURE

Students read and respond to British Literature ranging from epic tales from England’s history like Beowulf, to tales of fictional futuristic states such as Brave New World. Students improve their critical-thinking skills as they determine the underlying assumptions and values within the selected works and as they understand how the literature reflects the society of the time. Additionally, students continue to develop research skills and writing skills. Prerequisite: teacher recommendation (full year – 1 credit) 11, 12.

EEN786 AP ENGLISH LANGUAGE & COMPOSITION (A)

Students cultivate their understanding of writing and rhetorical arguments through reading, analyzing, and writing texts as they explore the rhetorical situation, claims and evidence, reasoning and organization, and style. Students demonstrate initiative, complete a great deal of individual work, and participate in demanding instruction. Students prepare to take the AP Language and Composition Examination. Prerequisite: teacher recommendation (full year – 1 credit) 11, 12.

EEN956 AP/UCONN ENGLISH LITERATURE (A,U)

UConn's introductory writing courses for first-year students expose students to academic writing practices which involve formulating inquiries, developing extensive intellectual projects, and producing knowledge for diverse audiences. Students engage in assignments where they choose and define topics to spark class discussions through various media. Additionally, students analyze genres, themes, and texts, with the option to sit for the AP Literature and Composition Exam. This course emphasizes the overall process of crafting academic writing over particular formats and platforms. Students build skills in topic selection, inquiry, drafting, revision, citation, audience awareness, and more. Prerequisite: teacher recommendation (full year – 1 credit) 11, 12.

UConn equivalent course: ENGL 1007: Seminar in Writing through Literature (4 credits).
EGH904 GOTHIC HORROR

This course will trace the development of both horror and gothic literature through representative readings such as The Haunting of Hill House, The Shining, and The Winter People. Students develop their reading, writing, speaking, and critical thinking skills while engaging with novels, short stories, films, and other media of the gothic horror genre (Semester - ½ credit) 11, 12.

EHL904 HEROES IN LITERATURE AND FILM

This course explores the archetypes of heroes and heroines. Students will read, view, and listen to a multitude of texts including excerpts from Beowulf, myths from cultures around the world, and other short stories, poems, plays, documentaries, films, videos, speeches, and other media. The class will also look at literature featuring ordinary people who find themselves in circumstances that require extraordinary acts, and examine them in relation to the hero's journey (Semester - ½ credit) 11, 12.

EIR904 IDENTITY AND RELATIONSHIPS

This course explores issues of identity and relationships through the lens of contemporary literature such as The Art of Racing in the Rain, My Sister’s Keeper, and The Color Purple. Students will analyze the different ways that people build and rebuild their sense of identity. Students will also examine the influential nature of our personal relationships. Students develop their reading, writing, speaking, and critical thinking skills while engaging with novels, short stories, films, and other media related to identity and relationships (Semester - ½ credit) 11, 12.

EJN301 JOURNALISM

Students gain a strong understanding of the techniques that make a good print, digital, or video journalist. In a hands-on format, students build on their knowledge of effective writing, story construction, style and editing. Students develop the technology and writing skills to produce the school newspaper and TV news program. Students may take the course more than once for credit. Does not count toward English credit (full year – 1credit) 9, 10, 11, 12.

ELM892 MYTH & THE MOVIES

Students explore the heroic quest in movies, view films as a contemporary form of mythmaking, and identify the heroic journey in several film genres including thrillers, science fiction, adventure, romance, western, comedy and horror. Does not count towards English credit (½ year – ½ credit) 11 & 12.

EMC904 MULTICULTURAL LITERATURE

Students read, write about, and discuss contemporary works forming the quilt of our ever-increasing diversity. Students study African-American and African; Hispanic-American and Latino; Asian-American; and Native-American literatures in the four major literary forms: novel, short story, drama and poetry and in nonfiction (full year – 1 credit) 11 & 12.

EML904 MEDIEVAL LITERATURE

In this course, students will embark on a righteous quest with Sir Gawain, stand up for justice with Robin Hood, trade scandalous stories with the pilgrims of The Canterbury Tales, and dive into the drama of King Arthur's Court. Through the study of medieval history, literature, and art, students will investigate the roots of Western beliefs about ideas like love, loyalty, justice, and honor, and discover the influence history has on artistic expression (Semester - ½ credit) 11, 12.

EMS904 MORALITY, ETHICS, AND SCANDAL IN SPORTS

In this course, students will explore the moral and ethical aspects of sports. They will analyze topics such as fair play, fan conduct, the use of performance-enhancing substances, gender equality in sports, misconduct in athletics, and issues related to youth participation in sports. Students will be expected to evaluate their personal values, beliefs, and goals in relation to their future lives and careers, and reflect on them from an ethical and situational perspective. To immerse themselves in ethical scenarios, students will engage with videos and relevant articles on current events. (Semester - ½ credit) 11, 12.

EPA904 POST-APOCALYPTIC LITERATURE AND FILM

Students will explore texts and films such as I am Legend, The Road, and “By the Waters of Babylon.” This class is designed for students who enjoy sci-fi, horror, fantasy, and speculative fiction while analyzing themes of survival, morality, hope, loss, and leadership when civilization falls. Students develop their reading, writing, speaking, and critical thinking skills while engaging with novels, short stories, films, and other media of the post-apocalyptic genre (Semester - ½ credit) 11, 12.

ERL301 READING LEARNING LAB

This semester-long course is designed to help develop and foster reading skills for those students who would benefit from additional support. Students engage in word-work, fluency practice, and literacy strategies and discussions that can be applied to content area curriculum. Reading lab students receive monthly progress monitoring assessments and are given benchmark assessments each quarter. This course addresses students’ individual needs in various areas of reading, and provides systematic, explicit instruction that integrates listening, speaking, reading and writing. Does not count toward English credit. Prerequisite: Teacher recommendation required (Semester - ½ humanities elective credit) 9, 10, 11, 12.

ERS904 RACE AND GENDER IN SPORTS

This course explores how race and gender impact sports culture, participation, representation, and results. We will study prejudice, favoritism, stereotyping, lack of representation, and marginalization. Students will analyze key issues and controversies related to race and gender in amateur and professional athletics. Students will also study the representation of different race and gender identities in sports settings. Students will better understand the intersections between race, gender, and sports, both in the present day and historical contexts. (Semester - ½ credit) 11, 12.

ESC904 SUCCESS AND LOSS

This course explores issues of success and loss through the lens of contemporary literature such as Tuesdays With Morrie, Still Alice, and Angela’s Ashes. Students will examine different perspectives on what makes for a successful life and analyze how various people cope with loss. Students develop their reading, writing, speaking, and critical thinking skills while engaging with novels, short stories, films, and other media related to success and loss (Semester - ½ credit) 11, 12.

ESH904 SHAKESPEARE & MODERN DRAMA

Students explore plays as a form of literature through Shakespeare and 20th/21st-century playwrights who followed in his footsteps, including O’Neill, Albee, Mamet, Miller, and McDonagh. Students bring these works to life actively through staged readings and acting, expository and creative writing, and short films (full year – 1 credit) 11 & 12.

ESJ904 POWER, PROTEST, AND SOCIAL JUSTICE

In this course, students will study the important relationship between art and activism. Students will read a variety of texts by authors who sought to protest against problems in society and change our world by impacting the hearts and minds of readers through the written word. Class texts represent anti-war movements, civil rights protests, women's rights protests, proletarian literature, and more. Students can expect to trace the development of contemporary social, political, and economic issues from the early 20th century to the present as well as popular responses to those issues through an examination of each movements’ novels, poems, short stories, non-fiction pieces, and films (Semester - ½ credit) 11, 12.

ESL956 UCONN CONTEMPORARY ISSUES IN SPORTS (U)

Through the reading of a wide range of texts, this course will explore socio-cultural, economic, political, and other related issues in sport. Students will examine the impact of sport on culture and how culture impacts sport. Students will also engage in discussion of issues in sport relative to gender, race(ethnicity), differing physical and intellectual ability, sexual identity, and gender identity. Prerequisite: teacher recommendation (full year – 1 credit) 11,12.

UCONN equivalent course: EDLR 2001: Contemporary Issues in Sport

ESP985 HONORS PUBLIC SPEAKING (E)

This ECSU-equivalent course offers students an opportunity to learn the fundamentals of speech communication and the opportunity to earn university credit. Students listen to, deliver, discuss, research, write and respond to informative, persuasive, interview and impromptu speeches. Students explore topics like rhetorical situations, claims and evidence, reasoning and organization, and style while writing and delivering their own speeches. Speeches are videotaped and critiqued. Prerequisite: teacher recommendation (full year – 1 credit) 11, 12.

ECSU equivalent course COM230: Basic Speech (3 credits)

EWL301 WRITING LEARNING LAB

This semester-long course is designed to help develop and foster writing skills for those students who would benefit from additional support with written expression. Students engage in regular writing to build fluency, and focus on writing strategies that can be applied to content area curriculum. Writing lab students are monitored through classroom benchmark assessments and iXL practice. This course addresses students’ individual needs in various areas of writing, and provides students with skills that will support them in all academic classes. Does not count toward English credit. Prerequisite: Teacher recommendation required (Semester - ½ humanities elective credit) 9, 10, 11, 12.

EWL904 WOMEN IN LITERATURE

Women in Literature is a semester-long course that introduces 11th and 12th grade students to the history, traditions, and forms of literature written by and about women. Students will examine the effects of gender on literature and consider how gender intersects with race, ethnicity, class, sexual orientation, and other factors in shaping identity. The course will consider the multiple ways women writers have responded to being silenced throughout history. Students will explore a rich and diverse range of writers and works to identify the recurrent images, themes, and styles of an evolving canon. Works of poetry, prose, drama, non-fiction, and film will be studied (Semester - ½ credit) 11, 12.

EWR904 WAR LITERATURE

This course will explore themes of patriotism and heroism, the sacrifices of war and conflict, the experience of the individual soldier and the larger society in conflict, the aftermath of war and the internal and external struggles to make sense of the sacrifice of war. The course will include the exploration of protest, the struggle for peace and the role and impact of the home front on those who support and those who oppose conflicts/wars. The purpose of the course is to understand, through the study of relevant literature, speeches, poetry, music, essays and film, the totality of war, conflict and peace for both the individuals and the greater society, and historical context in which the events occur – as well as their reverberations over the course of time (Semester - ½ credit) 11, 12.

FGD501 CHILD GROWTH & DEVELOPMENT

Students develop an understanding of child development from prenatal to preschool stages of growth.  Students also explore parenting concepts and career opportunities in early childhood education and human resources, and participate in a simulated parenting project by caring for an infant (simulator) over the course of one weekend. (½ year – ½ credit) 10, 11 & 12.

FHD201 LIFE STAGES & DEVELOPMENT

Students explore their personal growth and development, future life decisions, lifestyle, and relationships. Students improve communication skills and gain a general overview of human development through team-building activities and group discussions, debates, and projects (½ year – ½ credit) 9, 10, 11 & 12.

FIF705 UCONN INDIVIDUAL & FAMILY DEVELOPMENT (U)

Students study human development and family studies in depth in this college-level course. Students gain an understanding of individual and family development over the lifespan and explore the development of the individual that occurs in family systems over time. Forty hours of student field study is a UConn/ECE requirement. This class requires a summer assignment (full year – 1 credit) 11 & 12.

UConn equivalent course: Individual & Family Development (3 credits)

FIT601 INTRODUCTION TO TEACHING

Students interested in exploring the field of education learn about the responsibilities of a teacher in elementary, middle and high school. Students learn about planning lessons, learning styles, and managing a classroom, as well as the role of education in the United States and how to become a certified teacher. Students job shadow teachers and practice lesson planning in a range of subject areas (½ year – ½ credit) 10, 11, 12.

GHC501 CIVICS LEVEL I (ML)

ML students beginning to develop English and literacy explore the meaning of American citizenship, rights, and responsibilities and learn and reinforce language skills through reading, writing and speaking. Prerequisite: Placement test or teacher or counselor recommendation (full year – 1 credit) 10, 11 & 12.

GHC511 CIVICS LEVEL II (ML)

ML students approaching social and academic English language profiency explore the meaning of American citizenship, rights, and responsibilities and learn and reinforce language skills through reading, writing and speaking. Prerequisite: Teacher or counselor recommendation (full year – 1 credit) 10, 11 & 12.

GHU601 U.S. HISTORY LEVEL I (ML)

ML students approaching social and academic English language proficiency learn about the modern history of the United States of America and reinforce language skills through reading, writing and speaking. Prerequisite: Placement test or teacher or counselor recommendation (full year – 1 credit) 11 & 12.

GHU611 U.S. HISTORY LEVEL II (ML)

ML students learn about the modern history of the United States of America and reinforce language skills through reading, writing and speaking. Prerequisite: Teacher or counselor recommendation (full year – 1 credit) 11 & 12.

GLS201 ACADEMIC LITERACY (ML)

Students enrolled in Multilingual English II or III or who have exited the ML program or EL classification develop academic literacy to prepare for the language demands across academic contexts with increased proficiency of productive and receptive language skills. Students think critically to evaluate and synthesize written and oral information as they build academic vocabulary, increase reading comprehension, improve writing fluency, and hone research skills. Prerequisite: Teacher or counselor recommendation (full year – 1 credit) 9, 10, 11 & 12.

GLS301/GLS302 ENGLISH I GRAMMAR/LANGUAGE (ML)

ML students developing English and literacy receive instruction in vocabulary, grammar, speaking, listening, and reading and writing to develop social and academic English skills. Students participate in activities to adjust to cultural differences and nuances of life in the United States. Prerequisite: Placement test or teacher or counselor recommendation (full year – 1 credit) 9, 10, 11 &12.

GLS311 ENGLISH II (ML)

ML students continue to focus upon mastery of English grammar, including thorough verb study and development of all language skills (reading, writing, speaking and listening). Students read and analyze a combination of short stories, novels, and poetry. Prerequisite: Placement test or GLS301/GLS302 and teacher or counselor recommendation (full year – 1 credit) 9, 10, 11 & 12.

GLS321 ENGLISH III (ML)

ML students read texts of multicultural stories, nonfiction, novels, and excerpts of classic works and participate in grammar lessons to reinforce reading, writing, speaking and listening skills. Prerequisite: Placement test or GLS311 and teacher or counselor recommendation (full year – 1 credit) 9, 10, 11 & 12.

GNA100/GNA101 NEW ARRIVAL ENGLISH GRAMMAR/LANGUAGE (ML )

Newly arrived ML students beginning to develop English and literacy receive instruction in vocabulary, grammar, speaking, listening, reading, and writing to develop social and academic English skills. Students participate in activities to adjust to cultural differences and nuances of life in the United States. Prerequisite: Placement test or teacher or counselor recommendation (full year – 2 credits – English and World Language) 9, 10, 11 & 12. 

HAP804 AFRICAN-AMERICAN/BLACK & PUERTO RICAN/LATINO HISTORY

Students gain a better understanding of the African-American/Black, Puerto Rican/Latino contributions to United States history, society, economy, and culture.  This class is for any student who wants a more complete and inclusive view of our nation. (full-year) 1 credit. Open to 11 & 12.

HEC905 HONORS ECONOMICS (E)

Students learn about microeconomics by studying the relationship among scarcity, opportunity, cost, supply and demand, and individual consumer and firm behavior. Students learn about macroeconomics by studying the economy as a whole, and by examining unemployment, productivity, inflation, trade, and development (full year – 1 credit) 11 & 12.

ECSU equivalent course ECO100: Political Economy of Social Issues (3 credits)

HEC956 AP/UCONN ECONOMICS (A,U)

Students learn about microeconomics by developing a thorough understanding of the economic principles that apply to consumers and producers within an economic system and of the nature of markets and the government’s role in the economy. Students learn about macroeconomics by studying the economic system as a whole including economic performance measures, the financial sector and international economics (full year – 1 credit) 12.

UConn equivalent course ECON1201: Principles of Microeconomics (3 credits) and ECON1202: Principles of Macroeconomics (3 credits)
HGE804 GENOCIDE STUDIES

Students examine genocide in modern history, including the Nazi Holocaust, to understand the causes, resistance, results, survival, and healing. Students research, discuss, role play, conduct oral history projects, participate in simulations, and listen to speakers to develop a deeper understanding of humanity and inhumanity (½ year – ½ credit) 11 & 12

HGS424 GLOBAL STUDIES & CITIZENSHIP

Students study the major regional issues shaping today’s world, explore the foundation of U.S. democracy, and examine the role of the United States in the world (full year – 1 credit, meets Civics requirement) 10.

HGS425 HONORS GLOBAL STUDIES & CITIZENSHIP

Students study the major regional issues shaping today’s world, explore the foundation of U.S. democracy, examine the role of the United States in the world, develop advanced writing skills, and complete major research projects, including participation in Connecticut History Day (full year – 1 credit – meets Civics requirement) 10.

HNA804 NATIVE AMERICAN HISTORY

This course surveys American Indian history, beginning with creation traditions and migration theories and continuing to the present day. It focuses on the history of the Eastern Woodland people and includes American Indian nations whose homelands are located within the contemporary United States. The course utilizes historical inquiry to answer important questions about the American Indian experience. (½ year - ½ credit)11 & 12.

HPO804 INTRO TO POLITICS

Students have a hands-on introduction to the theory and practice of the American political system and take part in simulations of electioneering and governing. May be taken for honors credit (full year – 1 credit)
11 & 12.

HPO805 HONORS INTRODUCTION TO POLITICS

Students have a hands-on introduction to the theory and practice of the American political system and take part in simulations of electioneering and governing. Honors students engage with in-depth resources to answer important research questions. (full year – 1 credit) 11 & 12.

HPS804 INTRODUCTION TO PSYCHOLOGY

To prepare for college-level psychology courses, students study human thought processes and behaviors, noted psychologists and psychiatrists, research methods, brain studies, motivation, states of consciousness, intelligence and creativity, stages of human development, personality theories, gender issues and relationships, psychological disorders and therapies (full year – 1 credit) 12.

HPS806 AP PSYCHOLOGY (A)

Students examine in depth the core concepts and theories of psychology to understand psychology as the study of the mind and human behavior. Students learn about important psychologists past and present, research methods, experiments and terminology, and students prepare for the AP Psychology examination (full year – 1 credit) 12.

HPT904 P3: PHILOSOPHY, PSYCHOLOGY & POP CULTURE

Students examine questions about the intersection of philosophy, psychology, and pop culture and enrich their knowledge and appreciation of all three: What if Socrates ruled Hogwarts? Can anyone resist the Sauron’s Ring of Power? Does free will or determinism dominate The Walking Dead? Students explore these and other questions and share their ideas, books, and resources (full year - 1 credit) 11 & 12.

HSL824 INTRODUCTION TO LAW

Students learn about the basic structure and procedures of the United States’ legal system, with a special focus on Connecticut. Students examine the rule of law and explore constitutional, family, civil and criminal law through reading, analysis, role play and interaction with legal professionals. (full year – 1 credit) 11 & 12.

HSO804 SOCIOLOGY

Students learn about human social behavior by focusing upon human development, cultural diversity, social class, gender and the role of institutions such as family, education, and religion. In this hands-on class, students explore careers in the field of sociology and learn how sociologists conduct research to understand and explain societal issues like criminal behavior (full year – 1 credit) 11 & 12.

HSO806 UCONN SOCIOLOGY (U)

This course helps students understand the interconnection between society, groups and the individual. Students explore general themes, such as diversity, religion, culture, family, and various societal forces which intersect with one another to shape everyday lives. (full-year) 1 credit. Open to 11 &12.

UConn course equivalent SOCI1001: Sociology (3 credits)

HUS804 U.S. HISTORY

Students explore the development of the United States from the Federal Period to the 21st century to understand fundamental historical concepts and develop academic and communication skills (full year – 1 credit) 11.

HUS806 UCONN UNITED STATES HISTORY (U)

Students develop the skills and factual knowledge to critically analyze events in U.S. history. Students prepare to meet the writing and research requirements of intermediate and advanced college courses. Students assess historical materials and weigh evidence and interpretations in historical scholarship (full year –1 credit) 11 & 12.

UConn equivalent courses HIST1501: United States History to 1877 (3 credits) and HIST1502: United States History since 1877 (3 credits)
HWH004 MODERN WORLD HISTORY

Students learn the history of the modern world from the Renaissance through the twentieth century and those political, economic, geographic, and social concepts most applicable to life today. Students develop the inquiry skills to become engaged high school students and active community members (full year –1 credit). 9

HWH005 HONORS MODERN WORLD HISTORY

Students learn the history of the modern world from the Renaissance through the twentieth century and those political, economic, geographic, and social concepts most applicable to life today. Students develop the inquiry skills to become engaged high school students and active community members. Recommended for highly motivated students with strong critical reading and writing skills. Students will complete major research projects, including participation in Connecticut History Day (full year – 1 credit). 9

HWS804 WOMEN’S STUDIES

Students examine modern and historical women’s issues, including religion, love, marriage, family, beauty and body image; explore the impact of individuals and events on women’s lives; and analyze media, periodicals and primary source documents, including advertisements, art and women’s writings (½ year – ½ credit) 11 & 12.

HWT806 UCONN ANCIENT & MEDIEVAL WESTERN CIVILIZATION (U)

Students study the major developments of Western Civilization from ancient times through the early Renaissance (Mesopotamia, Egypt, Greece, Rome, Early Christianity, Crusades), and examine evidence surviving from the Ancient and Medieval Periods and the historian’s challenge to interpret these materials. Students develop research skills and participate in a project using Slater Museum’s collections (full year –1 credit) 11 & 12. This course will be offered every other year. It will be next offered during the 2025-2026 school year.

UConn course equivalent HIST 1300: Western Traditions before 1500 (3 credits)

ICC704 COUNTERCULTURE

Students study the literature, music, and film of the innovative and revolutionary minds of the 20th century to develop an understanding of counter and subculture and their dynamic relationship to the mainstream. Students explore and critique the lasting effects of the Beats, jazz, hippy culture, new journalism, the fight for equality, NOW, the Black Panthers, the search for peace and Zen, punk rock, the angst of Generation X, and the rage of urban communities. Students create works including spontaneous prose and poetry, rap and outlandish, but culturally relevant, social scripture (full year-1 credit) 11 & 12. 

LAS304 AMERICAN SIGN LANGUAGE 1

Students develop a basic understanding of fundamentals in visual, receptive and expressive skills for grammar, facial markers, classifiers, fingerspelling and vocabulary building. Students also study Deaf culture and history to develop the conversational/cultural behaviors for beginning-level conversations in ASL (full year – 1 credit) 10, 11 & 12. 

LAS354 AMERICAN SIGN LANGUAGE 2

Students build and expand upon their visual, receptive and expressive skills for grammar, facial markers, classifiers, fingerspelling and vocabulary. Students practice facial grammar and non-manual markers; students also practice conversational skills with more emphasis upon building vocabulary and pragmatics. Students learn more about Deaf culture and history. Prerequisite: LAS304 (full year – 1 credit) 10, 11 & 12.

LAS654 AMERICAN SIGN LANGUAGE 3

Students expand their language skills and increase fluency. Students continue to develop proficiency in receptive and expressive signing, interactive communication, and culture and language concepts. Students also expand their understanding of Deaf culture and history through discussion and study of ASL literature. Prerequisite: LAS354 (full year – 1 credit) 11 & 12.

LCH304 CHINESE 1

Students develop listening, speaking, reading, and writing skills in Chinese to meet every day needs. Students also develop an awareness of similarities and differences between their own and Chinese culture (full year – 1 credit) 9, 10, 11 & 12.

LCH354 CHINESE 2

Students continue to develop and strengthen listening, speaking, reading and writing skills in Chinese. Stu-dents also develop an understanding of cultural heritage. Prerequisite: LCH304 or equivalent with teacher recommendation (full year – 1 credit) 9, 10, 11 & 12.

LCH654 CHINESE 3

Students deepen and enhance listening, speaking, reading and writing skills in Chinese. They also acquire appreciation of the cultural, artistic and intellectual accomplishments of Chinese-speaking countries/regions. Prerequisite: LCH354 or equivalent with teacher recommendation (full year – 1 credit) 9, 10, 11 & 12.

LCH856 UCONN CHINESE 4 (U)

Students focus upon intensive development and use of grammar and vocabulary, develop fluency in oral communication, reading and writing, and exploration and research of aspects of Chinese culture, history and literature. Prerequisite: Successful completion of LCH654 or permission of teacher (full year – 1 credit) 11 & 12.

UConn equivalent course CHIN 1114: Intermediate Chinese II (4 credits)

LCH956 AP CHINESE LANGUAGE & CULTURE (A)

Students further develop language proficiencies in listening, speaking, reading, and writing Chinese while learning about the culture. Students use and study materials and participate in activities adapted from authentic sources to support linguistic and cultural goals. Prerequisite: LCH856 and/or permission of teacher (full year – 1 credit) 11 & 12.

LCM204 WORLD MYTHOLOGY

This course will explore how Classical/World myths address major concepts such as human origin, cultural truth values of a society, and the human need for storytelling. By critically reading ancient myths and contemporary versions of those myths, as well as by examining modern myths in media, students will appreciate the role of myth in societies and begin to understand the role of myth in our modern society. (half year – 1/2 credit) 9, 10, 11 & 12.

LFR304 FRENCH 1

Students, in all grade levels with or without experience, develop listening, speaking, reading, and writing skills in French to meet everyday needs. Students also develop awareness of similarities and differences between their own and French culture (full year – 1 credit) 9, 10, 11 & 12.

LFR354 FRENCH 2

Students continue to develop and strengthen listening, speaking, reading and writing skills in French, and develop understanding of cultural heritage. Prerequisite: LFR304 or equivalent, or some native speaker background (full year – 1 credit) 10, 11 & 12.

LFR654 FRENCH 3

Students deepen and enhance listening, speaking, reading and writing skills in French and acquire an appreciation of the cultural, artistic and intellectual accomplishments of French-speaking countries. Prerequisite: LFR354 or equivalent; not intended for students who have completed LFR655 with C- or above (full year – 1 credit) 10, 11 & 12.

LFR655 HONORS FRENCH 2

Students who have successfully completed French 1 and have a teacher recommendation broaden and deepen listening, speaking, reading and writing skills in French at an accelerated pace to prepare to take more advanced language study and earn college credit. Students also deepen cultural understanding. Prerequisite: LFR304 and teacher recommendation (full year – 1 credit) 10, 11 & 12.

LFR854 FRENCH 4

Students deepen reading, writing, speaking, and especially listening skills in French by exploring culture, history, and everyday life through classic and modern cinema of France and other French-speaking cultures. Students study vocabulary and grammar as an inte-gral component of the course. Prerequisite: LFR654 or teacher recommendation (full year – 1 credit) 11 & 12.

LFR855 HONORS FRENCH 3

Students develop fluency in oral communication by focusing upon intensive study of grammar and vocabulary, and by exploring and researching aspects of French culture, history and literature. Prerequisite: LFR655 (full year – 1 credit) 11 & 12.

LFR956 UCONN FRENCH GLOBAL CULTURE (U)

Within the context of weekly conversational topics about various Francophone cultures, students participate in intense, rigorous, and active study and practice oral French in dialogues, interviews, round tables and oral reports. Prerequisite: LFR855 or teacher recommendation (full year – 1 credit) 12.

UConn equivalent courses: FREN 3250: Global Culture 1 (3 credits); FREN 3268: Grammar and Composition (3 credits)

LIT304 ITALIAN 1

In this beginning course designed for all grade levels with or without experience, students develop listening, speaking, reading, and writing skills in Italian to meet every day needs. Students also develop awareness of similarities and differences between their own and Italian culture (full year – 1 credit) 9, 10, 11 & 12.

LIT354 ITALIAN 2

Students continue to develop and strengthen listening, speaking, reading and writing skills in Italian, and develop an understanding of cultural heritage. Prerequisite: LIT304 (full year - 1 credit) 9, 10, 11 & 12.

LIT654 ITALIAN 3

Students deepen and enhance listening, speaking, reading, and writing skills and acquire an appreciation of cultural, artistic, and intellectual accomplishments within the Italian culture. Prerequisite: LIT354 (full year – 1 credit) 11 & 12.

LIT856 UCONN ITALIAN 4 (U)

Students attain proficiency to understand, speak, read, and write Italian at a college level and to develop and refine skills acquired over several years of study. Prerequisite: LIT654 or LIT655 (full year – 1 credit) 11 & 12.

UConn equivalent course: ILCS3239 Italian Conversation and Conversation I (3 credits)

LLA304 LATIN 1

Students start to build a foundation of Latin vocabulary to support them through higher levels. Students read Latin sentences and short stories, begin to use phrases and sentences and write in Latin. Students develop cultural understanding through readings and discussion. Students will develop novice-level language skills and learn about Ancient Roman culture. (full year – 1 credit) 9, 10, 11 & 12.

LLA354 LATIN 2

Students build upon the skills and standards of Latin I by learning to interact in more complex situations, reading more complicated materials and writing more extended passages. Students increase their understanding of Ancient Roman culture through reading and discussion. Students continue to develop language skills and to acquire an understanding
of Latin. Prerequisite: LLA304 (full year – 1 credit) 10, 11 & 12.

LLA655 HONORS LATIN 3

Students acquire the vocabulary and reading strate-gies to understand, analyze, interpret, and enjoy the language and literature of the late Roman Republic and early Empire. Prerequisite: LLA354 or equivalent (full year – 1 credit) 11 & 12.

LLA956 UCONN LATIN 4 (U)

Students expand their lexical and reading skills to understand, analyze, interpret, and enjoy the literature of late Roman Republic and early Empire. Students complete outside readings in English and Latin to develop analytical skills and a background in literary criticism. Prerequisite: LLA655 or equivalent (full year – 1 credit) 12.

UConn equivalent course CAMS3102: Topics in Advanced Latin (3 credits)

LML304 EXPLORATION OF WORLD LANGUAGES

Provides students with general information about spoken and written languages and introduces the relationship among the products, practices, and perspectives of the associated cultures. Prerequisite: Open to 9th graders to help decide which language to continue with. Open to 10th graders with a teacher recommendation. (full year – 1 credit) 9 & 10

LPO354 PORTUGUESE 2

Students continue to develop listening, speaking, reading, and writing skills in Portuguese and develop understanding of cultural heritage. Prerequisite: LPO304 (full year - 1 credit) 9, 10, 11 & 12

LSC855 HONORS SPANISH CONVERSATION 4

Students prepare for AP Spanish Language by furthering their oral fluency and synthesizing their acquired skills and experiences in role play and interaction in Spanish. Students study grammar as appropriate. Prerequisite: LSP654, LSP655, LSL855 or equivalent; not intended for native speakers (full year – 1 credit) 11 & 12.

LSC956 AP/UCONN SPANISH LANGUAGE (A, U)

Students attain proficiency to understand, speak, read, and write Spanish at a college level and to develop and refine skills acquired over several years of study. Students focus upon mastery of language skills, rather than on the content of specific texts. Fee: Cost of textbook. Prerequisite: LSC855, LSL855 or equivalent (full year – 1 credit) 12.

UConn equivalent course SPAN3178: Intermediate Spanish Composition (3 credits)

LSL855 HONORS SPANISH LITERATURE 4

Students deepen comprehension and interpretive skills by studying poetry, music, essays, and short stories reflecting the culture and history of Spanish-speaking countries. Students develop writing style, refine grammar and extend vocabulary. Prerequisite: LSP461, LSP654, LSP655, LSC855 or teacher recommendation (full year –1 credit) 11 & 12.

LSP304 SPANISH 1

Students develop listening, speaking, reading, and writing skills in Spanish to meet every day needs. Students also develop awareness of similarities and differences between their own and Spanish culture (full year – 1 credit) 9, 10, 11 & 12.

LSP354 SPANISH 2

Students continue to develop and strengthen listening, speaking, reading, and writing skills in Spanish and develop understanding of cultural heritage. Prerequisite: LSP304 (full year – 1 credit) 10, 11 & 12.

LSP361 SPANISH FOR NATIVE SPEAKERS 1

This course is recommended for students who speak Spanish at home and/or who have lived in or attended school in a Spanish speaking country.  Students improve their literary and conversational skills while building a foundation for Advanced Placement Spanish in their senior year (full year – 1 credit) 9, 10, 11 & 12.

LSP375 HONORS SPANISH 1-2

Students, highly successful in Spanish in eighth grade or previously, take this more intensive, accelerated, advanced course to broaden and deepen their listening, speaking, reading, and writing skills and their cultural understanding. Coursework focuses upon building proficiency in the spoken language, and students in this level prepare to take Advanced Placement in their senior year.  Prerequisite: Teacher recommendation (full year – 1 credit) 9, 10, 11 & 12.

LSP461 SPANISH FOR NATIVE SPEAKERS 2

In this second course of a two-year sequence, fluent native speakers of Spanish refine and further develop their reading, writing, and speaking skills with emphasis on spelling and grammatical structure. Prerequisite: LSP361 or teacher recommendation (full year – 1 credit) 10, 11 & 12.

LSP654 SPANISH 3

Students deepen and enhance listening, speaking, reading, and writing skills in Spanish and acquire an appreciation of the cultural, artistic and intellectual accomplishments of Spanish-speaking countries. Prerequisite: LSP354 or equivalent; not intended for students who have completed LSP655 with C- or above (full year - 1 credit) 10, 11 & 12.

LSP655 HONORS SPANISH 2-3

Students in this accelerated course continue to deepen and broaden their listening, speaking, read-ing, and writing skills in Spanish and further develop their cultural understanding. Coursework focuses upon building proficiency in the spoken language, and students in this level prepare to take Advanced Placement in their senior year. Prerequisite: LSP375 or special teacher recommendation (full year – 1 credit) 10, 11 & 12.

TAB341 CONCERT BAND

Students in this class focus on the basics of ensemble playing including, scales, sight-reading, and basic band literature.

Open to all grade 9 students with at least one-year experience playing a brass, woodwind, or percussion instrument (flute/piccolo, clarinet, oboe, saxophone, bassoon, trumpet, trombone, French horn, baritone/euphonium, tuba, percussion). All first year members of the marching band are required to take concert band for 1 year.

Concert Band’s major required annual performances include the Winter, Spring, and Pops Concerts, and Spring Adjudication Festival. The class requires student participation in after-school dress rehearsals and in the concert performance (full year – 1 credit) grade 9 and all upper-grade students with less than 2 years on their instrument.

TAB361 PERCUSSION ENSEMBLE

Percussion Ensemble is an intermediate-level music class open to students who play percussion (snare drum, bass drum, mallet percussion, timpani, auxiliary percussion) and have completed at least one year of concert band. Students will learn a variety of percussion instruments and will perform as an independent ensemble along with serving as the percussion section for the Concert and Symphonic bands. Students in this group have the opportunity to participate in a yearly overnight music trip to compete as a part of both bands.

Past trips have included Virginia Beach, Boston, New York, and Washington DC. Required annual performances include Winter, Spring, and Pops Concerts, along with all Symphonic Band Concerts. The class requires student participation in after-school dress rehearsals and in the concert performances. Note: Students who are new to percussion should register for Concert Band.

PREREQUISITE: Concert Band (full year – 1 credit) 10, 11 & 12 May be repeated for credit

TAB365 HONORS PERCUSSION ENSEMBLE

Honors Percussion Ensemble is our advanced-level percussion class which is open to students in grades 11 & 12 who have completed at least 1 year of concert band and 1 year of Percussion Ensemble. This class focuses on advanced levels of rehearsing and performing percussion instruments including 3 yearly concerts, daily rehearsals during school, opportunities for group lessons after school, and a yearly overnight music trip. Past trips have included Virginia Beach, Boston, New York, and Washington DC. Required annual performances include the Winter, Spring, and Pops Concerts, and Spring Festival. The class requires student participation in after-school dress rehearsals and in the concert performance. Students in this class are also required to prepare and audition for the New England Music Festival in December and perform in the Honors recital in the spring.

PREREQUISITE: Concert Band & Percussion Ensemble (full year – 1 credit) 11 & 12 May be repeated for credit

TAB371 SYMPHONIC BAND

Symphonic Band is our intermediate-level band class which is open to students in grade 10-12 who have completed at least 1 year of concert band. Instruments that can be played in this group include: Flute, Piccolo, Clarinet, Bass Clarinet, Oboe, Bassoon, Alto Saxophone, Tenor Saxophone, Baritone Saxophone, Euphonium, Tuba, Trombone, Trumpet, and French Horn. Students in 9th grade are required to take one year of Concert Band prior to enrollment in Symphonic Band.

This class focuses on advanced levels of rehearsing and performing in a band setting, including 3 yearly concerts, daily rehearsals during school, opportunities for group lessons after school, and a yearly overnight music trip. Past trips have included Virginia Beach, Boston, New York, and Washington DC.

Required performances include the Winter, Spring, and Pops Concerts, and Spring Festival. The class requires student participation in after-school dress rehearsals and in the concert performance (full year – 1 credit)

Note: Percussion students, grades 10, 11 and 12, should register for Percussion Ensemble. May be repeated for credit

TAB375 HONORS SYMPHONIC BAND

Honors Symphonic Band is our advanced-level band class which is open to students in grades 11 & 12 who have completed at least 1 year of concert band and 1 year of Symphonic Band. This class focuses on advanced levels of rehearsing and performing in a band setting, including 3 yearly concerts, daily rehearsals during school, opportunities for group lessons after school, and a yearly overnight music trip. Past trips have included Virginia Beach, Boston, New York, and Washington DC.

Symphonic Band’s required annual performances include the Winter, Spring, and Pops Concerts, and Spring Adjudication Festival. The class requires student participation in after-school dress rehearsals and in the concert performance (full year – 1 credit) Students in this class are also required to prepare and audition for the New England Music Festival in December and perform in the Honors recital in the spring. Prerequisite: 1 year of Concert Band & 1 Year of Symphonic Band (full year – 1 credit) 11 & 12 May be repeated for credit.

TAC001 CONCERT CHOIR (.5 CREDIT)

Students experience positive musical performance in a large mixed-choral ensemble that explores literature including selections from all periods, styles and cultures. Students develop individual and ensemble skills in vocal performance with an emphasis on part and sight-singing. Students attend all required rehearsals and performances. No audition required. Can be repeated (½ year – ½ credit) 9, 10, 11 & 12.

TAC101 CONCERT CHOIR 1

Students experience positive musical performance in a large mixed-choral ensemble that explores literature including selections from all periods, styles and cultures. Students develop individual and ensemble skills in vocal performance with an emphasis on part and sight-singing. Students attend all required rehearsals and performances. No audition required. Can be repeated (1 year – 1 credit) 9, 10, 11 & 12.

TBP301 PIANO 1

Students with no prior knowledge of piano learn the basic playing techniques and develop skills using scales, music theory and piano performance repertoire (½ year – ½ credit) 9, 10, 11 & 12.

TBP401 PIANO 2

Students refine piano technique through an in-depth study of standard piano repertoire and scales and recital performance. Prerequisite: TBP301 (½ year – ½ credit) 10, 11 & 12.

TBP501 PIANO 3

Students learn, practice, and play a more advanced repertoire, and perform in recital. Prerequisite: TBP401 or audition (½ year – ½ credit) 10, 11 & 12.

TCG371 COLOR GUARD

Color Guard Class is a basic level class open to anyone in any grade who would like to learn the basics of spinning and tossing a color guard flag. No experience is required to join this class, and students will be provided with all necessary equipment at no cost. Students with previous experience will be challenged to learn new tosses, spins, and tricks, and will also have the opportunity to serve as mentors and to create basic choreography for the class. In addition to basic fundamentals, students will also learn about Winter Guard International (WGI), Drum Corps International (DCI), and the fall USBANDS competitive circuits. (1/2 year- 1/2 credit) Grades 9, 10, 11, & 12. This class may be repeated for credit.

TCH651 CHAMBER CHOIR

Students sight-sing proficiently and adhere to the highest standard of musical excellence in this advanced singing course for four to eight-part mixed voices. Students attend all required rehearsals and performances. Prerequisite: Audition (full year – 1 credit) 10, 11 & 12.

TCH655 HONORS CHAMBER CHOIR

Students will audition for Honors Chamber Choir. Students will be required to audition for various festivals, participate in additional performances, and submit singing assessments of increased difficulty. Prerequisite: TAC001 (full year – 1 credit) 10, 11 & 12.

TJZ651 WILDCAT JAZZ BAND

Wildcat Jazz Band is an audition-based group, open to students, grades 9-12, who play saxophone, trombone, piano, drum set, electric guitar, upright or electric bass, and trumpet. Students cover a variety of Jazz Literature including Swing, Latin, Big Band, Funk, and Blues. The Jazz Band meets one night per week after school.

Wildcat Jazz Band's required annual events include two concerts in April and May, two to four competitive festivals outside of the school day, and Class Night. Prerequisite: Audition (after school - ½ credit) 9, 10, 11 & 12.

Auditions take place in December and rehearsals start in January.

TMB371 MARCHING BAND & COLOR GUARD

 

Students looking for a competitive performance experience paired with the excitement of a fall sport are able to join the NFA Wildcat Marching Band and Colorguard. This ½ credit class is open to all students in all grades and does not require previous experience to participate. A two-week band camp in August where marching, music, and dance basics will be learned is required for all students in this class. Marching Band rehearses three evenings per week after school (Monday, Wednesday, Friday) as well as on Saturdays from late August through November.

Students in grades 9-12 who play a brass, woodwind, or percussion instrument (flute, piccolo, clarinet, saxophone, trumpet, French horn, trombone, baritone, tuba, piano, drums, or mallet percussion) or who have an interest in learning to spin and toss a flag (colorguard) are welcome to join this competitive ensemble.

Marching Band’s major required annual events include all home football games (plus Thanksgiving every other year), Saturday competitions (September-November), The Winterfest Parade in December, two Memorial Day Parades, and other community events.

Students are required to register for Family ID through NFA Athletics and must have an up to date physical on file with the medical center prior to the first day of band camp. All first-year marchers are required to enroll in a full year of concert band, orchestra, percussion ensemble, or symphonic band. (PM Class- ½ credit) Grades 9, 10, 11 & 12 This class may be repeated for credit

TMT601 MUSIC THEORY 1

Music theory is the study of how music works. From note reading, rhythmic structure, and key signatures, to form, melody, and harmony, this class will prepare students who intend to pursue music in college for their first semester of College level theory, and will help students who currently sing or play an instrument or wish to write music to understand their craft at a deeper level. Prerequisite: Experience in performing ensemble or instructor approval (1/2 year – 1/2 credit) Grades 10, 11 & 12

TOR361 ORCHESTRA

Orchestra is our mixed-level string ensemble which is open to all students, grades 9-12, who currently play or would like to learn to play the violin, viola, cello, and upright bass. There are also limited spots available for Piano and/or Harp however, students must have previous experience with these instruments and must study privately outside of school.

Students in this class will participate in 4 weekly rehearsals during the school day as well as group lessons once a week after school. Orchestra’s major required annual performances include the Winter, Spring, and Pops Concerts, an outreach concert, and a spring Adjudication Festival. Students participate in required after-school dress rehearsals, and as inventory allows, instruments are provided for class use. (full year – 1 credit) Grades 9, 10, 11 & 12 This class may be repeated for credit and does not have any prerequisites.

TOR365 HONORS ORCHESTRA

Students will audition for Honors during the regular audition time in May of the previous school year. Students will be required to audition for festivals, participate in additional performances, and submit playing assessments of increased difficulty. Prerequisite: 1 year of TOR361 (full year – 1 credit) 10, 11 & 12.