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NCAA

Courses that have been reviewed and approved by the National Collegiate Athletic Association as meeting its definition of a core course. For more information on NCAA eligible NFA courses go HERE and enter the NFA school code 070590.

EAE904 ALIEN ENCOUNTERS

This course seeks to strengthen and develop students’ reading, writing, speaking, listening, and reasoning skills in a curriculum grounded in the science fiction sub-genre of alien encounters. Students will read, view, and write about a variety of texts including classics like The War of the Worlds and films such as 2002’s Signs. “Alien Encounters” examines the theme of contact between humans and aliens and its reflection of society's beliefs, prejudices, and values of the time (Semester - ½ credit) 11, 12.

ECT904 CREATION AND TECHNOLOGY

This course explores literature that addresses the ever-emerging advances in technology and science. From The Time Machine to The Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde, humanity’s fascination with advancement and genetics has shaped the literature and film of the 19th, 20th, and 21st centuries. Students develop their reading, writing, speaking, and critical thinking skills while engaging with novels, short stories, films, and other media of the science fiction genre related to creation and technology (Semester - ½ credit) 11, 12.

ECW691 CREATIVE WRITING (ELECTIVE)

Students will express themselves creatively in a variety of genres including poetry, short stories, memoirs, children’s books, drama, essays, etc. Students will explore different elements of writing such as voice, point of view, figurative language, imagery, diction, dialogue and more. Additionally, the class will use pieces of literature as exemplars for writing. Students will be given writing prompts and time in class both to write and share their writing with peers, and to give and receive constructive feedback. Students may take the course more than once for credit. Does not count towards English credit (Semester – ½ humanities elective credit) 10, 11 & 12.

EDL904 DYSTOPIAN LITERATURE

Students study elements of dystopian literature through a wide range of texts including classics like Lord of the Flies, and more modern texts like Uglies, and The Marrow Thieves. Throughout history, authors have used dystopias, narratives showing the imagined downfall of societies, as a way to caution people about issues in society while also encouraging readers to strive for a more perfect world. Students develop their reading, writing, speaking, and critical thinking skills while engaging with novels, short stories, films, and other media of the dystopian genre (Semester - ½ credit) 11, 12.

EEN004 ENGLISH 1

Students develop their ability to recognize and write well-constructed English sentences and paragraphs and to speak effectively. Additionally, vocabulary study and reading literary classics encourage growth of reading fluency and comprehension. Students learn the basics of the research paper (full year – 1 credit).

EEN005 HONORS ENGLISH 1

At an in-depth and accelerated pace, students develop their ability to recognize and write well-constructed English sentences and paragraphs and to speak effectively. Additionally, vocabulary study and reading literary classics encourage growth of reading fluency and comprehension. Recommended for highly motivated students whose middle school indicate a level of proficiency in critical reading and writing skills to be successful in grade 9 honors-level coursework (full year – 1 credit).

EEN404 ENGLISH 2

Students read and respond to short stories, poetry, speeches, and novels written by American authors, and practice reading, writing, and research skills through daily and long-term assignments (full year – 1 credit) 10.

EEN485 HONORS ENGLISH 2

Students cover the EEN404 curriculum at a more advanced pace and depth. EEN485 focuses heavily on academic writing and literary analysis and is designed to prepare students for future honors, AP, and college-level courses. Prerequisite: teacher recommendation (full year – 1 credit) 10.

EEN785 HONORS BRITISH LITERATURE

Students read and respond to British Literature ranging from epic tales from England’s history like Beowulf, to tales of fictional futuristic states such as Brave New World. Students improve their critical-thinking skills as they determine the underlying assumptions and values within the selected works and as they understand how the literature reflects the society of the time. Additionally, students continue to develop research skills and writing skills. Prerequisite: teacher recommendation (full year – 1 credit) 11, 12.

EEN786 AP ENGLISH LANGUAGE & COMPOSITION (A)

Students cultivate their understanding of writing and rhetorical arguments through reading, analyzing, and writing texts as they explore the rhetorical situation, claims and evidence, reasoning and organization, and style. Students demonstrate initiative, complete a great deal of individual work, and participate in demanding instruction. Students prepare to take the AP Language and Composition Examination. Prerequisite: teacher recommendation (full year – 1 credit) 11, 12.

EEN956 AP/UCONN ENGLISH LITERATURE (A,U)

UConn's introductory writing courses for first-year students expose students to academic writing practices which involve formulating inquiries, developing extensive intellectual projects, and producing knowledge for diverse audiences. Students engage in assignments where they choose and define topics to spark class discussions through various media. Additionally, students analyze genres, themes, and texts, with the option to sit for the AP Literature and Composition Exam. This course emphasizes the overall process of crafting academic writing over particular formats and platforms. Students build skills in topic selection, inquiry, drafting, revision, citation, audience awareness, and more. Prerequisite: teacher recommendation (full year – 1 credit) 11, 12.

UConn equivalent course: ENGL 1007: Seminar in Writing through Literature (4 credits).
EGH904 GOTHIC HORROR

This course will trace the development of both horror and gothic literature through representative readings such as The Haunting of Hill House, The Shining, and The Winter People. Students develop their reading, writing, speaking, and critical thinking skills while engaging with novels, short stories, films, and other media of the gothic horror genre (Semester - ½ credit) 11, 12.

EHL904 HEROES IN LITERATURE AND FILM

This course explores the archetypes of heroes and heroines. Students will read, view, and listen to a multitude of texts including excerpts from Beowulf, myths from cultures around the world, and other short stories, poems, plays, documentaries, films, videos, speeches, and other media. The class will also look at literature featuring ordinary people who find themselves in circumstances that require extraordinary acts, and examine them in relation to the hero's journey (Semester - ½ credit) 11, 12.

EIR904 IDENTITY AND RELATIONSHIPS

This course explores issues of identity and relationships through the lens of contemporary literature such as The Art of Racing in the Rain, My Sister’s Keeper, and The Color Purple. Students will analyze the different ways that people build and rebuild their sense of identity. Students will also examine the influential nature of our personal relationships. Students develop their reading, writing, speaking, and critical thinking skills while engaging with novels, short stories, films, and other media related to identity and relationships (Semester - ½ credit) 11, 12.

EJN301 JOURNALISM

Students gain a strong understanding of the techniques that make a good print, digital, or video journalist. In a hands-on format, students build on their knowledge of effective writing, story construction, style and editing. Students develop the technology and writing skills to produce the school newspaper and TV news program. Students may take the course more than once for credit. Does not count toward English credit (full year – 1credit) 9, 10, 11, 12.

EMC904 MULTICULTURAL LITERATURE

Students read, write about, and discuss contemporary works forming the quilt of our ever-increasing diversity. Students study African-American and African; Hispanic-American and Latino; Asian-American; and Native-American literatures in the four major literary forms: novel, short story, drama and poetry and in nonfiction (full year – 1 credit) 11 & 12.

EML904 MEDIEVAL LITERATURE

In this course, students will embark on a righteous quest with Sir Gawain, stand up for justice with Robin Hood, trade scandalous stories with the pilgrims of The Canterbury Tales, and dive into the drama of King Arthur's Court. Through the study of medieval history, literature, and art, students will investigate the roots of Western beliefs about ideas like love, loyalty, justice, and honor, and discover the influence history has on artistic expression (Semester - ½ credit) 11, 12.

EPA904 POST-APOCALYPTIC LITERATURE AND FILM

Students will explore texts and films such as I am Legend, The Road, and “By the Waters of Babylon.” This class is designed for students who enjoy sci-fi, horror, fantasy, and speculative fiction while analyzing themes of survival, morality, hope, loss, and leadership when civilization falls. Students develop their reading, writing, speaking, and critical thinking skills while engaging with novels, short stories, films, and other media of the post-apocalyptic genre (Semester - ½ credit) 11, 12.

ESC904 SUCCESS AND LOSS

This course explores issues of success and loss through the lens of contemporary literature such as Tuesdays With Morrie, Still Alice, and Angela’s Ashes. Students will examine different perspectives on what makes for a successful life and analyze how various people cope with loss. Students develop their reading, writing, speaking, and critical thinking skills while engaging with novels, short stories, films, and other media related to success and loss (Semester - ½ credit) 11, 12.

ESH904 SHAKESPEARE & MODERN DRAMA

Students explore plays as a form of literature through Shakespeare and 20th/21st-century playwrights who followed in his footsteps, including O’Neill, Albee, Mamet, Miller, and McDonagh. Students bring these works to life actively through staged readings and acting, expository and creative writing, and short films (full year – 1 credit) 11 & 12.

ESJ904 POWER, PROTEST, AND SOCIAL JUSTICE

In this course, students will study the important relationship between art and activism. Students will read a variety of texts by authors who sought to protest against problems in society and change our world by impacting the hearts and minds of readers through the written word. Class texts represent anti-war movements, civil rights protests, women's rights protests, proletarian literature, and more. Students can expect to trace the development of contemporary social, political, and economic issues from the early 20th century to the present as well as popular responses to those issues through an examination of each movements’ novels, poems, short stories, non-fiction pieces, and films (Semester - ½ credit) 11, 12.

ESP985 HONORS PUBLIC SPEAKING (E)

This ECSU-equivalent course offers students an opportunity to learn the fundamentals of speech communication and the opportunity to earn university credit. Students listen to, deliver, discuss, research, write and respond to informative, persuasive, interview and impromptu speeches. Students explore topics like rhetorical situations, claims and evidence, reasoning and organization, and style while writing and delivering their own speeches. Speeches are videotaped and critiqued. Prerequisite: teacher recommendation (full year – 1 credit) 11, 12.

ECSU equivalent course COM230: Basic Speech (3 credits)

EWL904 WOMEN IN LITERATURE

Women in Literature is a semester-long course that introduces 11th and 12th grade students to the history, traditions, and forms of literature written by and about women. Students will examine the effects of gender on literature and consider how gender intersects with race, ethnicity, class, sexual orientation, and other factors in shaping identity. The course will consider the multiple ways women writers have responded to being silenced throughout history. Students will explore a rich and diverse range of writers and works to identify the recurrent images, themes, and styles of an evolving canon. Works of poetry, prose, drama, non-fiction, and film will be studied (Semester - ½ credit) 11, 12.

EWR904 WAR LITERATURE

This course will explore themes of patriotism and heroism, the sacrifices of war and conflict, the experience of the individual soldier and the larger society in conflict, the aftermath of war and the internal and external struggles to make sense of the sacrifice of war. The course will include the exploration of protest, the struggle for peace and the role and impact of the home front on those who support and those who oppose conflicts/wars. The purpose of the course is to understand, through the study of relevant literature, speeches, poetry, music, essays and film, the totality of war, conflict and peace for both the individuals and the greater society, and historical context in which the events occur – as well as their reverberations over the course of time (Semester - ½ credit) 11, 12.

GHC501 CIVICS LEVEL I (ML)

ML students beginning to develop English and literacy explore the meaning of American citizenship, rights, and responsibilities and learn and reinforce language skills through reading, writing and speaking. Prerequisite: Placement test or teacher or counselor recommendation (full year – 1 credit) 10, 11 & 12.

GHC511 CIVICS LEVEL II (ML)

ML students approaching social and academic English language profiency explore the meaning of American citizenship, rights, and responsibilities and learn and reinforce language skills through reading, writing and speaking. Prerequisite: Teacher or counselor recommendation (full year – 1 credit) 10, 11 & 12.

GHU601 U.S. HISTORY LEVEL I (ML)

ML students approaching social and academic English language proficiency learn about the modern history of the United States of America and reinforce language skills through reading, writing and speaking. Prerequisite: Placement test or teacher or counselor recommendation (full year – 1 credit) 11 & 12.

GHU611 U.S. HISTORY LEVEL II (ML)

ML students learn about the modern history of the United States of America and reinforce language skills through reading, writing and speaking. Prerequisite: Teacher or counselor recommendation (full year – 1 credit) 11 & 12.

GHW301 MODERN WORLD HISTORY LEVEL I (ML)

Ninth-grade ML students beginning to develop English and literacy explore modern world history from the Renaissance through the twentieth century and those political, economic, geographic, and social concepts most applicable to life today. Students develop the inquiry skills to become engaged students and active community members. Students learn and reinforce language skills through reading, writing, and speaking. Prerequisite: Placement test or teacher or counselor recommendation (full year – 1 credit) 9.

GHW311 MODERN WORLD HISTORY LEVEL II (ML)

Ninth-grade ML students approaching social and academic English language proficiency explore modern world history from the Renaissance through the twentieth century and those political, economic, geographic, and social concepts most applicable to life today. Students develop the inquiry skills to become engaged students and active community members. Students learn and reinforce language skills through reading, writing, and speaking. Prerequisite: Placement test or teacher or counselor recommendation (full year – 1 credit) 9.

GMA004 ALGEBRA I (ML)

ML students develop skills in basic and beginning algebraic functions, solving and graphing equations, inequalities, and systems of equations, and apply these skills to solve real-world problems. Students continue to gain language skills through speaking, listening, reading, and writing. This course is recommended for 9th-graders who have taken 8th-grade mathematics and who intend to follow a college preparatory mathematics sequence including Principles of Geometry and Algebra and Algebra 2 (full year – 1 credit). All ninth-grade mathematics courses require a scientific calculator (TI-30XIIS preferred). 9, 10, 11 & 12.

GPS501 PHYSICAL SCIENCE (ML)

ML students study a blend of the physical sciences (chemistry and physics) in a problem-based course. Students continue to gain language skills through speaking, listening, reading, and writing (full year – 1 credit) 11 & 12.

GSB401 BIOLOGY (ML)

Intermediate/advanced ML students learn about principles and concepts that apply to life at all levels of organization, no matter how simple or complex. Students examine those general characteristics shared by all living things, including chemical makeup, energy use, reproduction and community involvement. Students participate in laboratory work emphasizing the scientific method (full year – 1 credit) 10, 11 & 12.

GSI301 INTEGRATED SCIENCE (ML)

Intermediate/advanced ML students focus upon scientific experimentation, research, and discussion, exploring a wide range of topics from the origins of the universe to present-day conditions that support the diversity of life on Earth (full year – 1 credit) 9.

GSL201 LIFE SCIENCE (ML)

ML students beginning to develop English and literacy learn basic life science terminology (plants, animals, food webs, biomes, and ecosystems) and follow an integrated science curriculum focusing on Earth as a living system. Students continue to gain language skills through speaking, listening, reading, and writing (full year – 1 credit) 9, 10, 11 & 12.

HAP804 AFRICAN-AMERICAN/BLACK & PUERTO RICAN/LATINO HISTORY

Students gain a better understanding of the African-American/Black, Puerto Rican/Latino contributions to United States history, society, economy, and culture.  This class is for any student who wants a more complete and inclusive view of our nation. (full-year) 1 credit. Open to 11 & 12.

HCA802 CONTEMPORARY AMERICAN ISSUES

Students examine the issues, events, and people that shape our country today and develop skills necessary for critical analysis of the news and active participation in a democratic society. Prerequisite: Teacher or counselor recommendation (full year – 1 credit) 12.

HEC905 HONORS ECONOMICS (E)

Students learn about microeconomics by studying the relationship among scarcity, opportunity, cost, supply and demand, and individual consumer and firm behavior. Students learn about macroeconomics by studying the economy as a whole, and by examining unemployment, productivity, inflation, trade, and development (full year – 1 credit) 11 & 12.

ECSU equivalent course ECO100: Political Economy of Social Issues (3 credits)

HEC956 AP/UCONN ECONOMICS (A,U)

Students learn about microeconomics by developing a thorough understanding of the economic principles that apply to consumers and producers within an economic system and of the nature of markets and the government’s role in the economy. Students learn about macroeconomics by studying the economic system as a whole including economic performance measures, the financial sector and international economics (full year – 1 credit) 12.

UConn equivalent course ECON1201: Principles of Microeconomics (3 credits) and ECON1202: Principles of Macroeconomics (3 credits)
HGE804 GENOCIDE STUDIES

Students examine genocide in modern history, including the Nazi Holocaust, to understand the causes, resistance, results, survival, and healing. Students research, discuss, role play, conduct oral history projects, participate in simulations, and listen to speakers to develop a deeper understanding of humanity and inhumanity (½ year – ½ credit) 11 & 12

HGS424 GLOBAL STUDIES & CITIZENSHIP

Students study the major regional issues shaping today’s world, explore the foundation of U.S. democracy, and examine the role of the United States in the world (full year – 1 credit, meets Civics requirement) 10.

HGS425 HONORS GLOBAL STUDIES & CITIZENSHIP

Students study the major regional issues shaping today’s world, explore the foundation of U.S. democracy, examine the role of the United States in the world, develop advanced writing skills, and complete major research projects, including participation in Connecticut History Day (full year – 1 credit – meets Civics requirement) 10.

HMH804 MODERN HISTORY

Students examine American political, economic and social history and America’s role in the development of the modern world from 1960 to the present day with particular emphasis upon the Civil Rights Movement, political polarization, modern economic theory, the Counterculture, Vietnam, the Cold War, the Middle East, and the War on Terror (full year – 1 credit) 11 & 12.

HNA804 NATIVE AMERICAN HISTORY

This course surveys American Indian history, beginning with creation traditions and migration theories and continuing to the present day. It focuses on the history of the Eastern Woodland people and includes American Indian nations whose homelands are located within the contemporary United States. The course utilizes historical inquiry to answer important questions about the American Indian experience. (½ year - ½ credit)11 & 12.

HPO804 INTRO TO POLITICS

Students have a hands-on introduction to the theory and practice of the American political system and take part in simulations of electioneering and governing. May be taken for honors credit (full year – 1 credit)
11 & 12.

HPO805 HONORS INTRODUCTION TO POLITICS

Students have a hands-on introduction to the theory and practice of the American political system and take part in simulations of electioneering and governing. Honors students engage with in-depth resources to answer important research questions. (full year – 1 credit) 11 & 12.

HPS804 INTRODUCTION TO PSYCHOLOGY

To prepare for college-level psychology courses, students study human thought processes and behaviors, noted psychologists and psychiatrists, research methods, brain studies, motivation, states of consciousness, intelligence and creativity, stages of human development, personality theories, gender issues and relationships, psychological disorders and therapies (full year – 1 credit) 12.

HPS806 AP PSYCHOLOGY (A)

Students examine in depth the core concepts and theories of psychology to understand psychology as the study of the mind and human behavior. Students learn about important psychologists past and present, research methods, experiments and terminology, and students prepare for the AP Psychology examination (full year – 1 credit) 12.

HPT904 P3: PHILOSOPHY, PSYCHOLOGY & POP CULTURE

Students examine questions about the intersection of philosophy, psychology, and pop culture and enrich their knowledge and appreciation of all three: What if Socrates ruled Hogwarts? Can anyone resist the Sauron’s Ring of Power? Does free will or determinism dominate The Walking Dead? Students explore these and other questions and share their ideas, books, and resources (full year - 1 credit) 11 & 12.

HSL824 INTRODUCTION TO LAW

Students learn about the basic structure and procedures of the United States’ legal system, with a special focus on Connecticut. Students examine the rule of law and explore constitutional, family, civil and criminal law through reading, analysis, role play and interaction with legal professionals. (full year – 1 credit) 11 & 12.

HSO804 SOCIOLOGY

Students learn about human social behavior by focusing upon human development, cultural diversity, social class, gender and the role of institutions such as family, education, and religion. In this hands-on class, students explore careers in the field of sociology and learn how sociologists conduct research to understand and explain societal issues like criminal behavior (full year – 1 credit) 11 & 12.

HSO806 UCONN SOCIOLOGY (U)

This course helps students understand the interconnection between society, groups and the individual. Students explore general themes, such as diversity, religion, culture, family, and various societal forces which intersect with one another to shape everyday lives. (full-year) 1 credit. Open to 11 &12.

UConn course equivalent SOCI1001: Sociology (3 credits)

HUS804 U.S. HISTORY

Students explore the development of the United States from the Federal Period to the 21st century to understand fundamental historical concepts and develop academic and communication skills (full year – 1 credit) 11.

HUS806 UCONN UNITED STATES HISTORY (U)

Students develop the skills and factual knowledge to critically analyze events in U.S. history. Students prepare to meet the writing and research requirements of intermediate and advanced college courses. Students assess historical materials and weigh evidence and interpretations in historical scholarship (full year –1 credit) 11 & 12.

UConn equivalent courses HIST1501: United States History to 1877 (3 credits) and HIST1502: United States History since 1877 (3 credits)
HWC806 AP EUROPEAN HISTORY (A,U)

*This course will be offered every other year. It will be next offered during the 2024-2025 school year.

Students examine European events and movements from the Renaissance to the present day to understand the forces and ideas that have shaped our culture. Because the study of history goes beyond content, students study topics in a variety of ways and approaches, including analysis of primary source documents, classroom discussions, simulations and historical writing tasks (full year - 1 credit) 11 & 12.

UConn equivalent course: HIST1400: Modern Western Traditions (3 credits).

HWH004 MODERN WORLD HISTORY

Students learn the history of the modern world from the Renaissance through the twentieth century and those political, economic, geographic, and social concepts most applicable to life today. Students develop the inquiry skills to become engaged high school students and active community members (full year –1 credit). 9

HWH005 HONORS MODERN WORLD HISTORY

Students learn the history of the modern world from the Renaissance through the twentieth century and those political, economic, geographic, and social concepts most applicable to life today. Students develop the inquiry skills to become engaged high school students and active community members. Recommended for highly motivated students with strong critical reading and writing skills. Students will complete major research projects, including participation in Connecticut History Day (full year – 1 credit). 9

HWS804 WOMEN’S STUDIES

Students examine modern and historical women’s issues, including religion, love, marriage, family, beauty and body image; explore the impact of individuals and events on women’s lives; and analyze media, periodicals and primary source documents, including advertisements, art and women’s writings (½ year – ½ credit) 11 & 12.

HWT806 UCONN ANCIENT & MEDIEVAL WESTERN CIVILIZATION (U)

Students study the major developments of Western Civilization from ancient times through the early Renaissance (Mesopotamia, Egypt, Greece, Rome, Early Christianity, Crusades), and examine evidence surviving from the Ancient and Medieval Periods and the historian’s challenge to interpret these materials. Students develop research skills and participate in a project using Slater Museum’s collections (full year –1 credit) 11 & 12. This course will be offered every other year. It will be next offered during the 2025-2026 school year.

UConn course equivalent HIST 1300: Western Traditions before 1500 (3 credits)

ICC704 COUNTERCULTURE

Students study the literature, music, and film of the innovative and revolutionary minds of the 20th century to develop an understanding of counter and subculture and their dynamic relationship to the mainstream. Students explore and critique the lasting effects of the Beats, jazz, hippy culture, new journalism, the fight for equality, NOW, the Black Panthers, the search for peace and Zen, punk rock, the angst of Generation X, and the rage of urban communities. Students create works including spontaneous prose and poetry, rap and outlandish, but culturally relevant, social scripture (full year-1 credit) 11 & 12. 

LAS304 AMERICAN SIGN LANGUAGE 1

Students develop a basic understanding of fundamentals in visual, receptive and expressive skills for grammar, facial markers, classifiers, fingerspelling and vocabulary building. Students also study Deaf culture and history to develop the conversational/cultural behaviors for beginning-level conversations in ASL (full year – 1 credit) 10, 11 & 12. 

LAS354 AMERICAN SIGN LANGUAGE 2

Students build and expand upon their visual, receptive and expressive skills for grammar, facial markers, classifiers, fingerspelling and vocabulary. Students practice facial grammar and non-manual markers; students also practice conversational skills with more emphasis upon building vocabulary and pragmatics. Students learn more about Deaf culture and history. Prerequisite: LAS304 (full year – 1 credit) 10, 11 & 12.

LAS654 AMERICAN SIGN LANGUAGE 3

Students expand their language skills and increase fluency. Students continue to develop proficiency in receptive and expressive signing, interactive communication, and culture and language concepts. Students also expand their understanding of Deaf culture and history through discussion and study of ASL literature. Prerequisite: LAS354 (full year – 1 credit) 11 & 12.

LCH304 CHINESE 1

Students develop listening, speaking, reading, and writing skills in Chinese to meet every day needs. Students also develop an awareness of similarities and differences between their own and Chinese culture (full year – 1 credit) 9, 10, 11 & 12.

LCH354 CHINESE 2

Students continue to develop and strengthen listening, speaking, reading and writing skills in Chinese. Stu-dents also develop an understanding of cultural heritage. Prerequisite: LCH304 or equivalent with teacher recommendation (full year – 1 credit) 9, 10, 11 & 12.

LCH654 CHINESE 3

Students deepen and enhance listening, speaking, reading and writing skills in Chinese. They also acquire appreciation of the cultural, artistic and intellectual accomplishments of Chinese-speaking countries/regions. Prerequisite: LCH354 or equivalent with teacher recommendation (full year – 1 credit) 9, 10, 11 & 12.

LCH856 UCONN CHINESE 4 (U)

Students focus upon intensive development and use of grammar and vocabulary, develop fluency in oral communication, reading and writing, and exploration and research of aspects of Chinese culture, history and literature. Prerequisite: Successful completion of LCH654 or permission of teacher (full year – 1 credit) 11 & 12.

UConn equivalent course CHIN 1114: Intermediate Chinese II (4 credits)

LCH956 AP CHINESE LANGUAGE & CULTURE (A)

Students further develop language proficiencies in listening, speaking, reading, and writing Chinese while learning about the culture. Students use and study materials and participate in activities adapted from authentic sources to support linguistic and cultural goals. Prerequisite: LCH856 and/or permission of teacher (full year – 1 credit) 11 & 12.

LFR304 FRENCH 1

Students, in all grade levels with or without experience, develop listening, speaking, reading, and writing skills in French to meet everyday needs. Students also develop awareness of similarities and differences between their own and French culture (full year – 1 credit) 9, 10, 11 & 12.

LFR354 FRENCH 2

Students continue to develop and strengthen listening, speaking, reading and writing skills in French, and develop understanding of cultural heritage. Prerequisite: LFR304 or equivalent, or some native speaker background (full year – 1 credit) 10, 11 & 12.

LFR654 FRENCH 3

Students deepen and enhance listening, speaking, reading and writing skills in French and acquire an appreciation of the cultural, artistic and intellectual accomplishments of French-speaking countries. Prerequisite: LFR354 or equivalent; not intended for students who have completed LFR655 with C- or above (full year – 1 credit) 10, 11 & 12.

LFR655 HONORS FRENCH 2

Students who have successfully completed French 1 and have a teacher recommendation broaden and deepen listening, speaking, reading and writing skills in French at an accelerated pace to prepare to take more advanced language study and earn college credit. Students also deepen cultural understanding. Prerequisite: LFR304 and teacher recommendation (full year – 1 credit) 10, 11 & 12.

LFR854 FRENCH 4

Students deepen reading, writing, speaking, and especially listening skills in French by exploring culture, history, and everyday life through classic and modern cinema of France and other French-speaking cultures. Students study vocabulary and grammar as an inte-gral component of the course. Prerequisite: LFR654 or teacher recommendation (full year – 1 credit) 11 & 12.

LFR855 HONORS FRENCH 3

Students develop fluency in oral communication by focusing upon intensive study of grammar and vocabulary, and by exploring and researching aspects of French culture, history and literature. Prerequisite: LFR655 (full year – 1 credit) 11 & 12.

LFR956 UCONN FRENCH GLOBAL CULTURE (U)

Within the context of weekly conversational topics about various Francophone cultures, students participate in intense, rigorous, and active study and practice oral French in dialogues, interviews, round tables and oral reports. Prerequisite: LFR855 or teacher recommendation (full year – 1 credit) 12.

UConn equivalent courses: FREN 3250: Global Culture 1 (3 credits); FREN 3268: Grammar and Composition (3 credits)

LIT304 ITALIAN 1

In this beginning course designed for all grade levels with or without experience, students develop listening, speaking, reading, and writing skills in Italian to meet every day needs. Students also develop awareness of similarities and differences between their own and Italian culture (full year – 1 credit) 9, 10, 11 & 12.

LIT354 ITALIAN 2

Students continue to develop and strengthen listening, speaking, reading and writing skills in Italian, and develop an understanding of cultural heritage. Prerequisite: LIT304 (full year - 1 credit) 9, 10, 11 & 12.

LIT654 ITALIAN 3

Students deepen and enhance listening, speaking, reading, and writing skills and acquire an appreciation of cultural, artistic, and intellectual accomplishments within the Italian culture. Prerequisite: LIT354 (full year – 1 credit) 11 & 12.

LIT856 UCONN ITALIAN 4 (U)

Students attain proficiency to understand, speak, read, and write Italian at a college level and to develop and refine skills acquired over several years of study. Prerequisite: LIT654 or LIT655 (full year – 1 credit) 11 & 12.

UConn equivalent course: ILCS3239 Italian Conversation and Conversation I (3 credits)

LLA304 LATIN 1

Students start to build a foundation of Latin vocabulary to support them through higher levels. Students read Latin sentences and short stories, begin to use phrases and sentences and write in Latin. Students develop cultural understanding through readings and discussion. Students will develop novice-level language skills and learn about Ancient Roman culture. (full year – 1 credit) 9, 10, 11 & 12.

LLA354 LATIN 2

Students build upon the skills and standards of Latin I by learning to interact in more complex situations, reading more complicated materials and writing more extended passages. Students increase their understanding of Ancient Roman culture through reading and discussion. Students continue to develop language skills and to acquire an understanding
of Latin. Prerequisite: LLA304 (full year – 1 credit) 10, 11 & 12.

LLA655 HONORS LATIN 3

Students acquire the vocabulary and reading strate-gies to understand, analyze, interpret, and enjoy the language and literature of the late Roman Republic and early Empire. Prerequisite: LLA354 or equivalent (full year – 1 credit) 11 & 12.

LLA956 UCONN LATIN 4 (U)

Students expand their lexical and reading skills to understand, analyze, interpret, and enjoy the literature of late Roman Republic and early Empire. Students complete outside readings in English and Latin to develop analytical skills and a background in literary criticism. Prerequisite: LLA655 or equivalent (full year – 1 credit) 12.

UConn equivalent course CAMS3102: Topics in Advanced Latin (3 credits)

LPO304 PORTUGUESE 1

Students develop listening, speaking, reading, and writing skills in Portuguese to meet everyday needs.  Students also develop awareness of similarities and differences between their own and Portuguese culture.  (full year - 1 credit) 9, 10, 11 & 12.

LPO354 PORTUGUESE 2

Students continue to develop listening, speaking, reading, and writing skills in Portuguese and develop understanding of cultural heritage. Prerequisite: LPO304 (full year - 1 credit) 9, 10, 11 & 12

LSC855 HONORS SPANISH CONVERSATION 4

Students prepare for AP Spanish Language by furthering their oral fluency and synthesizing their acquired skills and experiences in role play and interaction in Spanish. Students study grammar as appropriate. Prerequisite: LSP654, LSP655, LSL855 or equivalent; not intended for native speakers (full year – 1 credit) 11 & 12.

LSC956 AP/UCONN SPANISH LANGUAGE (A, U)

Students attain proficiency to understand, speak, read, and write Spanish at a college level and to develop and refine skills acquired over several years of study. Students focus upon mastery of language skills, rather than on the content of specific texts. Fee: Cost of textbook. Prerequisite: LSC855, LSL855 or equivalent (full year – 1 credit) 12.

UConn equivalent course SPAN3178: Intermediate Spanish Composition (3 credits)

LSL855 HONORS SPANISH LITERATURE 4

Students deepen comprehension and interpretive skills by studying poetry, music, essays, and short stories reflecting the culture and history of Spanish-speaking countries. Students develop writing style, refine grammar and extend vocabulary. Prerequisite: LSP461, LSP654, LSP655, LSC855 or teacher recommendation (full year –1 credit) 11 & 12.

LSP304 SPANISH 1

Students develop listening, speaking, reading, and writing skills in Spanish to meet every day needs. Students also develop awareness of similarities and differences between their own and Spanish culture (full year – 1 credit) 9, 10, 11 & 12.

LSP354 SPANISH 2

Students continue to develop and strengthen listening, speaking, reading, and writing skills in Spanish and develop understanding of cultural heritage. Prerequisite: LSP304 (full year – 1 credit) 10, 11 & 12.

LSP361 SPANISH FOR NATIVE SPEAKERS 1

This course is recommended for students who speak Spanish at home and/or who have lived in or attended school in a Spanish speaking country.  Students improve their literary and conversational skills while building a foundation for Advanced Placement Spanish in their senior year (full year – 1 credit) 9, 10, 11 & 12.

LSP375 HONORS SPANISH 1-2

Students, highly successful in Spanish in eighth grade or previously, take this more intensive, accelerated, advanced course to broaden and deepen their listening, speaking, reading, and writing skills and their cultural understanding. Coursework focuses upon building proficiency in the spoken language, and students in this level prepare to take Advanced Placement in their senior year.  Prerequisite: Teacher recommendation (full year – 1 credit) 9, 10, 11 & 12.

LSP461 SPANISH FOR NATIVE SPEAKERS 2

In this second course of a two-year sequence, fluent native speakers of Spanish refine and further develop their reading, writing, and speaking skills with emphasis on spelling and grammatical structure. Prerequisite: LSP361 or teacher recommendation (full year – 1 credit) 10, 11 & 12.

LSP654 SPANISH 3

Students deepen and enhance listening, speaking, reading, and writing skills in Spanish and acquire an appreciation of the cultural, artistic and intellectual accomplishments of Spanish-speaking countries. Prerequisite: LSP354 or equivalent; not intended for students who have completed LSP655 with C- or above (full year - 1 credit) 10, 11 & 12.

LSP655 HONORS SPANISH 2-3

Students in this accelerated course continue to deepen and broaden their listening, speaking, read-ing, and writing skills in Spanish and further develop their cultural understanding. Coursework focuses upon building proficiency in the spoken language, and students in this level prepare to take Advanced Placement in their senior year. Prerequisite: LSP375 or special teacher recommendation (full year – 1 credit) 10, 11 & 12.

MAL004 ALGEBRA 1

Students develop skills in basic and beginning algebraic functions, solving and graphing equations, inequalities, and systems of equations, and apply these skills to solve real-world problems. This course is recommended for 9th-graders who have taken 8th-grade mathematics and who intend to follow a college preparatory mathematics sequence including Principles of Geometry and Algebra and Algebra 2 (full year – 1 credit). All ninth-grade mathematics courses require a scientific calculator (TI-30XIIS preferred). 9

MAL005 HONORS ALGEBRA 1

At an in-depth and accelerated pace, students develop skills in working with exponents and solving and graphing equations, inequalities and functions, systems of equations and quadratics, and apply these skills to solve real-world problems. This course is recommended for highly motivated students who have been introduced to beginning algebraic concepts, and it is the first in a college preparatory sequence including Honors Principles of Geometry and Algebra and Advanced or Honors Algebra 2. Prerequisite: Completion of eighth-grade math and teacher recommendation (full year – 1 credit). All ninth-grade mathematics courses require a scientific calculator (TI-30XIIS preferred). 9

MAL585 HONORS ALGEBRA 2 & TRIGONOMETRY

At an in-depth and accelerated pace, students develop advanced algebra skills through the study functions and their graphs, quadratic, polynomial, exponential and logarithmic equations, rational and radical expressions, exponents/powers, as well as, an introduction to trigonometry. Prerequisite: Teacher recommendation. (full year – 1 credit) 10, 11 & 12.

MAL654 ADVANCED ALGEBRA 2

Students develop advanced algebra skills through the study of functions and their graphs, quadratic equations, rational expressions, radical expressions, exponential and logarithmic equations, and exponents/powers. Prerequisite: MGS605, MGS555 or MGS604 and C+ in MAL004 or MAL005 and teacher recommendation (full year - 1 credit) 10, 11, 12.

MCA956 AP CALCULUS AB (A,E)

Students study topics of limits, derivatives, and integrals and their applications. Prerequisite: Teacher recommendation (full year – 1 credit) 12.

ECSU equivalent course MAT243: Calculus 1 (4 credits).

MFC953 FUNCTIONS

Students review and extend Algebra 2 concepts with a focus on quadratic, polynomial, rational, exponential, logarithmic, and radical functions. Prerequisites: Teacher recommendation (½ year/first semester – ½ credit) 12.

MFS854 PRECALCULUS

Students prepare for the study of calculus and strengthen their conceptual understanding of problems and mathematical reasoning in solving problems by studying a combination of trigonometric, geometric and algebraic techniques. Prerequisite:Teacher recommendation (full year – 1 credit) 10, 11 & 12.

MGS555 HONORS PLANE GEOMETRY/STATISTICS

*This course will be offered every other year. It will be next offered during the 2024-2025 school year.

At an in-depth level and accelerated pace, students study lines, planes, angles, triangles, circles, and polygons and learn about coordinates, three-dimensional geometry, probability, statistics and data analysis. Prerequisite: Teacher recommendation; (half year – ½ credit) 10, 11.

MGS604 PRINCIPLES OF GEOMETRY & ALGEBRA

Students will reinforce and build on their Algebra skills through their study of foundational Geometry topics. Topics include the study of points, and planes as they relate to 2-dimensional and 3-dimensional objects, including area and volume. Students also study topics related to probability, statistics, and data analysis. Prerequisite: Teacher recommendation (full year – 1 credit) 10, 11 & 12.

MGS605 HONORS PRINCIPLES OF GEOMETRY & ALGEBRA

Students will reinforce and build on their Algebra skills through their study of foundational Geometry topics at an in depth, accelerated pace. Topics include the study of points, and planes as they relate to 2-dimensional and 3-dimensional objects, including area and volume. Students also study topics related to probability, statistics, and data analysis. Prerequisite: Teacher recommendation (full year – 1 credit) 9, 10, 11 & 12.

MIC955 HONORS CALCULUS

At an in-depth and accelerated pace, students will strengthen their understanding of functions in preparation for the process of differentiation and integration. Calculus concepts explored include limits and continuity, derivatives, anti-derivatives, and application of derivatives. Prerequisite: Teacher recommendation (full year – 1 credit) 12.

MPS754 PROBABILITY & STATISTICS THROUGH MODELING

Students will study basic rules of probability and will be able to use them in modeling uncertainty in obtaining and recording data. They will be able to utilize graphical and numerical summaries of data and will apply the algebra, statistics, and probability principles in the context of sports and games. Prerequisites: Teacher recommendation (½ year/both semesters – ½ credit) 11, 12.

MSA804 STATISTICS

Students learn about the major concepts and tools for collecting, analyzing, and drawing conclusions from data with an emphasis on experiments and applications. Prerequisite: Teacher recommendation (full year – 1 credit) 12.

MSA806 AP STATISTICS (A,E)

Students learn standard and nonparametric approaches to statistical analysis; exploratory data analysis, elementary probability, sampling distributions, estimation and hypothesis testing, one- and two-sample procedures, regression and correlation. Fee: Cost of textbook. Prerequisite: Teacher recommendation (full year – 1 credit) 11 & 12.

ECSU equivalent course: MAT 216: Statistical Data Analysis (3 credits)

MTR953 TRIGONOMETRY

Students study the properties of triangles and trigonometric functions focusing upon the six basic trigonometric functions, their inverses, and their graphs from a practical and theoretical point of view. Prerequisites: Teacher recommendation (½ year/second semester – ½ credit) 12.

SAY601 ASTRONOMY

Students investigate the wonders of the night sky and the history of the universe, including its evolution and composition, the solar system, the life cycle of stars and galaxies, the search for extraterrestrial life, and the role of technology in the exploration of space (½ year – ½ credit) 10, 11 & 12.

SAY685 HONORS ASTRONOMY (E)

In this rigorous college-level course, students study the ever-changing universe while exploring galactic, stellar and planetary formation; investigate the relationships among math, physics, and astronomy; and study the history of astronomy.  Prerequisite: B or better in Honors Integrated Science and/or Recommendation from current science teacher (½ year –½ credit) 10, 11 & 12.

ECSU equivalent course AST214: Descriptive Astronomy w/Lab (4 credits)

SBT601 DNA SCIENCE

In this laboratory-centered course, students explore the different techniques and equipment used in forensic science, disease detection, agriculture, bioinformatics, anthropology, and the pharmaceutical industry, with special emphasis upon DNA and genetics (½ year – ½ credit) 11 & 12.

SBY004 BIOLOGY

In this introductory course, students learn about ecological systems, cell structure and function, metabolism and energy transformation, genetics, and other related topics. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate an understanding of life at the molecular, cellular, and population levels. Students participate in laboratory work (full year –1 credit) 10.

SBY075 HONORS BIOLOGY

Honors students undertake a more rigorous study of the essential biological concepts with an emphasis on biological chemistry, structure and function and energy transformations at all levels of organization (cellular, individual, and ecosystem). Students participate in extensive laboratory work. Prerequisites: Teacher recommendation (full year – 1 credit) 10.

SBY656 AP BIOLOGY (A)

In this rigorous and rewarding course, motivated, enthusiastic and interested students study all of the concepts and unifying themes in biology and meet the expectations of college freshmen in an introductory biology course. Students are expected to be self-motivated learners who complete assignments promptly, work independently, and think critically. Class attendance for lecture and laboratory is critical, and students work independently and think critically. Inquiry-based labs require cooperation with partners/groups. Prerequisite: SBY004 or SBY075 and teacher recommendation (full year – 1 credit) 11 & 12.

SCH485 INTRODUCTION TO UCONN CHEMISTRY

Students prepare for UConn Chemistry (SCH876) by emphasizing problem-solving and application of basic chemistry principles in this honors level class. Students seriously considering taking UConn Chemistry must take this class. Teacher recommendation (½ year – ½ credit) 10, 11 & 12.

SCH804 CHEMISTRY

Students investigate the nature and interactions of matter and energy and study topics including atomic structure, matter and energy, chemical formulas and bonding, chemical reactions and equations, the mole and stoichiometry, gas laws, and solutions. Prerequisite: Teacher recommendation This course is not for students who have completed SCH485 (full year – 1 credit) 11 & 12.

SCH805 HONORS CHEMISTRY

Students undertake a more rigorous and fast-paced study of the nature and Interactions of matter. Topics include atomic structure, matter, chemical formulas, bonding, reactions, thermochemistry, the mole, stoichiometry, gas laws, solutions, and acids and bases. Prerequisite: Teacher recommendation I (full year – 1 credit) 11 & 12.

SCH876 UCONN CHEMISTRY (U)

Students study general chemistry in depth at the college level and perform required after-school lab work and tests. UConn supplies tests, labs, online homework, and book work. Students complete summer coursework. Prerequisite: Teacher recommendation and SCH485 (full year – 1.25 credits) 11 & 12.

UConn equivalent course: CHEM127Q General Chemistry I (4 credits) and CHEM128Q General Chemistry II (4 credits)
SCS601 COASTAL STUDIES

Students learn about our amazing local resource, Long Island Sound, and human activity has impacted it. This hands-on marine science class with laboratory experiments, in-class projects, and the study of live marine organisms (½ year – ½ credit) 9, 10, 11 & 12.

SES485 INTRODUCTION TO AP/UCONN ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE

Students prepare for AP Environmental Science by studying ecosystem ecology, human populations, biomes, biodiversity, and conservation, and by participating in hands-on laboratory investigations and fieldwork. Emphasis is placed upon the skills to be successful in an AP course (½ year – ½ credit) 9, 10 & 11.

SES756 AP/UCONN ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE (A,U)

Students investigate the Earth’s biotic and abiotic systems and how humans influence and depend upon them. With sustainability as a central theme, specific course topics include ecology, natural resources management, energy, pollution, human population dynamics, and climate change. Students have opportunities for field study. (full year – 1 credit) 10, 11 & 12.

UConn equivalent course NRE1000: Environmental Science (3 credits)

SFS651 FORENSIC SCIENCE

Students apply physical, and life science concepts learned in previous science courses in modern-day criminology and laboratory techniques to solve hypo-thetical criminal scenarios (½  year  –  ½  credit) 11 & 12.

SGG001 GOING GREEN

Students increase awareness of their daily impact on the environment and learn basic “green” strategies to decrease their environmental footprint upon Earth (½ year – ½ credit) 9, 10, 11 & 12.

SHB804 ANATOMY & PHYSIOLOGY

Students explore the structure and function of the human body, with an emphasis on tissue organization and organ systems. Students complete laboratory exercises involving participatory research, group investigations, and dissection of Felis domesticus (full year – 1 credit) 11 & 12.

SHB805 HONORS ANATOMY & PHYSIOLOGY (E)

In this rigorous college-level course, students engage in a more thorough study of the regions, structure, and function of the human body with an emphasis on tissue organization and organ systems. Students complete laboratory exercises involving microscopy of tissues, dissection of Felis domesticus, and investigations of contemporary scientific research. Students complete summer coursework (full year – 1 credit) 11 & 12.

ECSU equivalent course Bio 202/203: Human Biology, Lecture & Lab (4 credits)

SIR385 HONORS INDEPENDENT RESEARCH

Before enrollment, students submit a written plan of study for independent research for Science Department Head approval and gain approval of a science faculty member to serve as a mentor. Students may enter the Connecticut Science Fair and comply with all regulations. Prerequisite: Science Department Head approval (full year – 1 credit)  10, 11 & 12.

SIS004 INTEGRATED SCIENCE

Through scientific experimentation, research and dis-cussion, students explore a wide range of topics from the origins of the universe to present day conditions that support the diversity of life on Earth (full year –1 credit).

SIS005 HONORS INTEGRATED SCIENCE

Through scientific experimentation, research and discussion, students explore a wide range of topics from the origins of the universe to present day conditions that support the diversity of life on Earth. Recommended for highly motivated students who posses the computing, reasoning, and reading skills needed to be successful in grade 9 honors-level coursework (full year – 1 credit).

SKS804 KINESIOLOGY

Students study human movement to prepare for college-level study in a range of health and human movement fields including exercise physiology, biomechanics, motor development, sports medicine, athletic training, and physical therapy. Using problem-based learning, students integrate knowledge of biological, physical, and chemical factors to analyze the human body’s response to exercise (full year – 1 credit) 11 & 12.

SMB651 MARINE BIOLOGY

Students learn about the various components of marine biology via marine ecosystems and marine species. Topics include the history of marine biology, invertebrates using taxonomy, vertebrates, and finally man’s impact on the marine environment and species. Students have opportunities for field studies with Project Oceanology (½ year – ½ credit) 10, 11 & 12.

SMD601 MICROBES & DISEASE

Students gain in-depth knowledge of basic biological and clinical aspects of viral and bacterial pathogens and the diseases they cause by studying principles of epidemiology, disease detection, and prevention, chain of infection and human immunology. Students learn laboratory procedures and principles vital for entry into various health care fields. Course SHM701 is recommended, though not required, prior to this class. (½ year - ½ credit) 11 & 12.

SOC601 ZOOLOGY

Students learn about the animal kingdom throughout the world with emphasis upon local species and their interactions with the environment. Topics include evolution, classification, genetics, and ecology. Many hands-on activities support learning throughout the course (½ year - ½ credit) 11 & 12.

SPE001 PREHISTORIC EARTH & PALEONTOLOGY

Students undertake an in-depth analysis of geological processes that shaped the earth and led to the fossilization of organisms during the Mesozoic Era. Students study plate tectonics, evolution, geology, and paleontology through independent assignments, laboratory activities and research projects (½ year – ½ credit) 9, 10 & 11.

SPY904 PHYSICS

Students study the mechanics and theory behind the interactions of solids, liquids, and gases, including motion, vector analysis, dynamics, momentum, work, energy, simple machines, sound, light, mirrors and lenses. Students are required to design, build, and test two STEM projects related to mechanics. Prerequisite: B or higher in Algebra 2 strongly recommended (full year – 1 credit) 11 & 12.

SPY956 UCONN PHYSICS 1 (U)

Students study Newtonian mechanics, work, energy, heat, fluids, mechanical waves and sound in this algebra-based physics course. This course is UConn PHYS1201Q (first-semester course in college physics) presented over a full year. Prerequisite: B or higher in Algebra 2 strongly recommended (full year – 1 credit) 11 & 12.

UConn equivalent course PHYS1201Q: General Physics I (4 credits)

SPY976 AP UCONN PHYSICS 1 & 2 (U)

Students cover material equivalent to two semesters of algebra-based college physics. Students study Newtonian mechanics, energy, heat, fluids, waves, and sound in the fall semester. In the spring semester, students study electricity and magnetism, modern physics and optics. After-school lab work is required. Fee: Cost of the textbook. Prerequisite: B or higher in Algebra 2 strongly recommended (full year – 1.25 credits) 11 & 12.

UConn equivalent course PHYS1201Q: General Physics I (4 credits) and PHYS1202Q: General Physics II (4 credits)
VEN704 INTRODUCTION TO ENGINEERING

Students delve into the engineering design process and explore different engineering fields. Using industry standard 3D modeling software, students create, problem solve and investigate engineering principles. Hands-on projects including solar race cars, and a bridge design and build simulation reinforces engineering concepts (½ year – ½ credit) 10, 11 & 12.