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STEM

STEM is an acronym for the fields of science, technology, engineering and math. Subjects may include Vocational: Career & Technical Education and Mathematics.

STEM

ACCOUNTING 1

BAC601 

Students learn about bookkeeping practices, including systemically computing, classifying, recording, verify-ing, and maintaining numerical data involved in financial practices. Students study simple budgets and financial report preparation, cash control, payroll, the accounting cycle, and career opportunities in the field. Students use an internet-based electronic workbook, and home internet access is recommended (full year – 1 credit vocational) 10, 11 & 12.

ACCOUNTING 2

BAC851

Students learn about keeping a set of books on a cash or accrual basis, partnership and corporation books, depreciation, inventory valuation, taxes, and computerized accounting practices. Students explore accounting, related career options, and trends in the industry. Prerequisite: C in BAC601 (full year – 1 credit) 11 & 12.

ADVANCED ALGEBRA 2

MAL654 

Students develop advanced algebra skills through the study of functions and their graphs, quadratic equations, rational expressions, radical expressions, exponential and logarithmic equations, and exponents/powers. Prerequisite: MGEE005, MGE555  or MGE554 and C+ in MAL004 or MAL005 and teacher recommendation (full year - 1 credit) 10, 11, 12.

ADVANCED GRAPHIC DESIGN

AGA875

Students continue to develop skills using Adobe programs (Photoshop, Illustrator, and InDesign) and strengthen creative skills while producing individual thesis projects and class assignments in this advanced-level course. Students choose to further their studies in Graphic Design, Digital Imaging or a combination of both. Studio fee, Prerequisite: AGA651 and/or instructor approval (full year –1 credit) 10, 11 & 12.

ADVANCED MANUFACTURING (T)

VMA854

Students accepted into the YMPI program will prepare for career opportunities in advanced manufacturing after high school.  Students learn the safe use of essential manufacturing tools and equipment.  Integrated throughout the class are opportunities for students to strengthen manufacturing mathematics, spatial reasoning, and workplace preparedness skills (resumes, interviewing, etc.) Students have the opportunity to gain OSHA 10 certification, 150 pre-apprenticeship hours, four college credits and interview with local employers. Prerequisite: VIM651 with C or higher, Additional  1/2 credit Tech Ed course, teacher/counselor approval (½ year - 1 credit).  Second semester, double channel, grade 12.

Three Rives Community College equivalent courses:

Manufacturing Machining: Benchwork (1 credit)
Safety in the Workplace (1 credit)
Blueprint Reading (2 credits)
ALGEBRA 1

MAL004 

Students develop skills in basic and beginning algebraic functions, solving and graphing equations, inequalities, and systems of equations, and apply these skills to solve real-world problems. This course is recommended for 9th-graders who have taken 8th-grade mathematics and who intend to follow a college preparatory mathematics sequence including Principles of Geometry and Algebra and Algebra 2 (full year – 1 credit). All ninth-grade mathematics courses require a scientific calculator (TI-30XIIS preferred).

Algebra 1 (ML)

GMA004

ML students develop skills in basic and beginning algebraic functions, solving and graphing equations, inequalities, and systems of equations, and apply these skills to solve real-world problems. Students continue to gain language skills through speaking, listening, reading, and writing. This course is recommended for 9th-graders who have taken 8th-grade mathematics and who intend to follow a college preparatory mathematics sequence including Principles of Geometry and Algebra and Algebra 2 (full year – 1 credit). All ninth-grade mathematics courses require a scientific calculator (TI-30XIIS preferred).

ALGEBRA 2

MAL873 

Students reinforce their Algebra 1 skills with extension review of linear equations, linear inequalities, and systems of equations.  Students study functions and their graphs, quadratic equations, radical expressions, and exponents/powers. Prerequisite: MGS653 or MIT613 and teacher recommendation (full year – 1 credit) 11 & 12.

AMERICAN REGIONAL CUISINES

FRC601

Students learn about the history and styles of North American and Caribbean cuisines. Students enhance culinary skills and gain an appreciation for great tasting food while applying sound cooking methodologies. Prerequisite: FFD201 or FFB301 (½ year – ½ credit) 10, 11 & 12.

ANATOMY & PHYSIOLOGY

SHB803

Students explore the structure and function of the human body, with an emphasis on tissue organization and organ systems. Students complete laboratory exercises involving participatory research, group investigations, and dissection of Felis domesticus (full year – 1 credit) 11 & 12.

AP BIOLOGY (A)

SBY656 

In this rigorous and rewarding course, motivated, enthusiastic and interested students study all of the concepts and unifying themes in biology and meet the expectations of college freshmen in an introductory biology course. Students are expected to be self-motivated learners who complete assignments promptly, work independently, and think critically. Class attendance for lecture and laboratory is critical, and students work independently and think critically. Inquiry-based labs require cooperation with partners/groups. Students complete summer coursework. Fee: Cost of the textbook. Prerequisite: Biology (full year – 1 credit) 11 & 12.

AP CALCULUS AB (A, E)

MCA956 

Students study topics of limits, derivatives, and integrals and their applications. Prerequisite: A- in MCA855 or B+ in MIC955 and current mathematics teacher’s approval (full year – 1 credit) 12.

AP COMPUTER SCIENCE A (A)

MCC976

In this class, comparable to a first-semester college-level class, students design, implement, and analyze programs and basic data structures, standard algorithms, and general computer systems knowledge with JAVA programming language. Prerequisite: Superior achievement in MCC551 and MCC875 and teacher recommendation. (Does not meet the mathematics graduation requirement.) (full year – 1 credit) 11 & 12.

AP ECONOMICS (A, U)

HEC956 

Students learn about microeconomics by developing a thorough understanding of the economic principles that apply to consumers and producers within an economic system and of the nature of markets and the government’s role in the economy. Students learn about macroeconomics by studying the economic system as a whole including economic performance measures, the financial sector and international economics (full year – 1 credit) 12.

UConn equivalent course ECON1201: Principles of Microeconomics (3 credits) and ECON1202: Principles of Macroeconomics (3 credits)
AP PSYCHOLOGY (A)

HPS806 

Students examine in depth the core concepts and theories of psychology to understand psychology as the study of the mind and human behavior. Students learn about important psychologists past and present, research methods, experiments and terminology, and students prepare for the AP Psychology examination (full year – 1 credit) 12.

AP STATISTICS (A, U)

MSA806 

Students learn standard and nonparametric approaches to statistical analysis; exploratory data analysis, elementary probability, sampling distributions, estimation and hypothesis testing, one- and two-sample procedures, regression and correlation.  Fee: Cost of textbook. Prerequisite: B+ in MFS854 or B- in MCA855 and current mathematics teacher’s approval (full year – 1 credit) 11 & 12.

UConn equivalent course STAT1100Q: Elementary Concepts of Statistics (3 credits)

AP/UCONN ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE (A, U)

SES756

Students investigate the Earth’s biotic and abiotic systems and how humans influence and depend upon them. With sustainability as a central theme, specific course topics include ecology, natural resources management, energy, pollution, human population dynamics, and climate change. Students have opportunities for field study, engage in required after-school labs, and complete summer coursework (full year – 1.25 credit) 10, 11 & 12.

UConn equivalent course: Environmental Science (4 credits)

AP UCONN PHYSICS 1 & 2 (U)

SPY976

Students cover material equivalent to two semesters of algebra-based college physics. Students study Newtonian mechanics, energy, heat, fluids, waves, and sound in the fall semester. In the spring semester, students study electricity and magnetism, modern physics and optics. After-school lab work is required. Fee: Cost of the textbook. Prerequisite: B or higher in Algebra 2 strongly recommended (full year – 1.25 credits) 11 & 12.

UConn equivalent course:
General Physics I (4 credits)
General Physics II (4 credits)
AQUARIUM SCIENCE 1

SAQ601 

Students explore the physical, chemical, and biological processes occurring in the aquarium environment and learn about the variety of applications, techniques, equipment, and fish to successfully establish and maintain a tropical freshwater aquarium. Using group aquaria, students feed, test water quality, identify and control disease and parasites, and learn husbandry techniques. Students have opportunities for field studies with Project Oceanology, public aquaria, and/or zoos (½ year – ½ credit) 9, 10, 11 & 12.

AQUARIUM SCIENCE 2

SAQ621

Students explore the more complicated levels of the physical, chemical, and biological processes occurring in the saltwater aquarium environment and learn about the variety of applications, techniques, equipment, and fish identification to successfully establish and maintain a group saltwater aquarium. Students explore saltwater identification of fish, invertebrates, and corals. Students have opportunities for field studies with Project Oceanology, public aquariums and or public zoos. Prerequisite: SAQ601 (½ year – ½ credit) 9, 10, 11 & 12.

AQUARIUM SCIENCE WORK-STUDY

SAQ631 

Students independently practice aquarium husbandry techniques to care for and maintain many of the Marine Science program’s fresh and saltwater aquariums over the summer break. Prerequisites: Successful completion of SAQ601 & SAQ621 and instructor permission (summer course – ½ credit) 10 & 11.

ASTRONOMY

SAY601

Students investigate the wonders of the night sky and the history of the universe, including its evolution and composition, the solar system, the life cycle of stars and galaxies, the search for extraterrestrial life, and the role of technology in the exploration of space (½ year – ½ credit) 10, 11 & 12.

BAKESHOP 1

FFB301 

Students with an interest in baking and pastries learn basic baking principles and techniques including measurement, ingredient function and baking procedures. Students prepare a variety of baked goods and pastries including quick bread, cakes, and fruit desserts while practicing safe and proper use of kitchen equipment (½ year – ½ credit) 9, 10, 11 & 12.

BAKESHOP 2

FFB501 

Students build upon the foundation of Bakeshop 1.  Focus on new techniques will be introduced through various units including: desserts bars, tarts and pies, yeast breads, enriched doughs and enriched doughs, confections, French Cookies, candies and dessert sauces. Students will review safety/sanitation, measuring and basic terms. Students will be introduced to advanced baking terminology, skills and technique. Prerequisite: FFB301 (½ year – ½ credit) 10, 11 & 12.

BIOLOGY

SBY004/SBY002 

In this introductory course, students learn about ecological systems, cell structure and function, metabolism and energy transformation, genetics, and other related topics. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate an understanding of life at the molecular, cellular, and population levels. Students participate in laboratory work (full year –
1 credit) 10.

BIOLOGY (ML)

GSB401 

Intermediate/advanced ML students learn about principles and concepts that apply to life at all levels of organization, no matter how simple or complex. Students examine those general characteristics shared by all living things, including chemical makeup, energy use, reproduction and community involvement. Students participate in laboratory work emphasizing the scientific method (full year – 1 credit) 10, 11 & 12.

BRICKVIEW BAKESHOP

FBB701

Students expand upon the fundamentals of baking taught in Bakeshop 1 and Bakeshop 2.  Students will focus on commercial production and the sale of baked goods in the Brickview Restaurant and Cafe. Students learn new baking techniques and key aspects of operating a business, explore careers in the field according to what is relevant and current in today's food industry and trends. Course can be retaken for credit. Prerequisite: C or higher in FFB501 or FBR871 (½ year, ½ credit)  10, 11 & 12.

BRICKVIEW RESTAURANT

FBR871 

Students interested in culinary, hospitality, and management careers gain essential technical and leadership skills while operating the Brickview Restaurant on campus. Students work in a commercial kitchen rotating through various jobs in restaurant management and operations. Students enrolled in this course will have the opportunity to become ServSafe certified, tour a local restaurant, and participate in a food critic dining experience. Prerequisite: 1 credit in any combination of culinary courses. Course can be retaken for credit (full year – 1 credit) 10, 11 & 12.

BUSINESS COMMUNICATIONS

BBC301

Communication impacts all aspects of our lives.  Students learn the value of clear and concise communication in their personal and professional life by enhancing oral, written, interpersonal and technological skills, including the use of social media for college and the workplace.  Students will complete a Job Search Portfolio, consisting of a cover letter, résumé, recommendation request and interview questions. (1/2year, 1/2 credit) 10, 11, 12

BUSINESS EXPLORATIONS

BBE101 

Students interested in pursuing a career in business, majoring in business, or starting their own business gain an understanding of key entrepreneurial and business concepts. Students learn about starting a business and the many career options available in the industry. Students study entrepreneurship, basic economic principles, forms of business ownership, career planning, and global business practices (½ year – ½ credit) 10, 11 & 12.

BUSINESS OPERATIONS &ENTREPRENEURSHIP

BUS501 

Students interested in starting & operating their own business are encouraged to take this course.  Students will explore the path to becoming a successful entrepreneur and take a hands-on role in running NFA’s school store.  Students will create a business plan and work with local agencies who support start-up companies.   Students work in the Cat Shack and assist with merchandising, financials, operations, promotions, and inventory which help to build student resumes.   Prerequisite: BBE101, BSE401 or BMK401 (½ year – ½ credit) 11 & 12.

CERTIFIED NURSE AIDE PROGRAM

ICN801 

In this rigorous and challenging course, serious students gain classroom and hands-on training to offer high-quality care to patients while working alongside other qualified healthcare professionals. The program is designed to prepare individuals with the necessary skills and knowledge to become a Certified Nurse Aide. Students will take this course on the TRCC campus during the school day. NFA will provide transportation to TRCC during the school day. Second-semester clinicals may involve after-school or weekend hours and students are responsible for transportation outside of school hours. As part of the class, students will register for and sit for the C.N.A exam. Students must perform successfully on the state examination to be certified. Students must have a flu shot and be medically cleared to enroll. Prerequisite: Students must be accepted into the program through an application process completed in grade 11. Students must adhere to all vaccination requirements required by TRCC and the facilities where clinicals are conducted. (full year – ½ credit classroom and 1 credit clinical ) 12.

CERTIFIED VETERINARY ASSISTANT TRAINING PROGRAM

SSV604 

In this independent-study course, students prepare to become Certified Veterinary Assistants by following an online curriculum, including online readings, instructional videos, and assessments. Prerequisite: Successful completion of SSV601 and Science Depart-ment Head approval (½ year – ½ credit) 11 & 12.

CHEMISTRY

SCH804 

Students investigate the nature and interactions of matter and energy and study topics including atomic structure, matter and energy, chemical formulas and bonding, chemical reactions and equations, the mole and stoichiometry, gas laws, and solutions. Prerequisite: B or higher in Algebra. This course is not for students who have completed SCH485 (full year – 1 credit)
11 & 12.

COASTAL STUDIES

SCS601

Students study the biology, chemistry, physics, and geology of Long Island Sound in this hands-on marine science class. This is an activity based class with laboratory experiments, in-class projects, and the study of live marine organisms (½ year – ½ credit) 10, 11 & 12.

COMMUNITY DESIGN

ACD661 

Students use creative skills to produce visual projects such as posters, fliers, logos, murals, etc., for various school and community clients with specific art-related needs. Students generate work manually and digitally. They develop interpersonal, social, and verbal com-munication skills as they work with clients for specific outcomes. Studio fee, Prerequisite: ADR661, APA001, APA601, or AGA651 (full year – 1 credit) 10, 11 & 12.

COMPUTER SCIENCE 1

MCC551

Students develop skills in problem-solving and writing object-oriented computer programs using Visual Basic programming language. Students develop an understanding of language syntax, problem analysis, and problem-solving techniques through individualized programming assignments, and study topics including the history of computers, basic computer architecture and social issues involving computers. Prerequisite: B+ in MAL004 (Does not meet the mathematics graduation requirement.) (full year – 1 credit) 9, 10, 11 & 12.

CONSUMER MATH

MCR671 

Students reinforce mathematical skills through an extensive review of fundamental mathematical concepts, including the order of operations, real numbers, percent, and formulas, and apply these skills to consumer problems such as earning, spend-ing, taxes, housing, insurance, transportation and budgeting. Prerequisite: MGE653 (full year – 1 credit) 12.

CULINARY ARTS 1

FFD201 

In this introduction to the world of cooking, students learn to prepare basic foods including quick bread, dairy, cookies, meats, and salads. In cooking labs, students learn about kitchen safety, sanitation, measuring, reading recipes, nutrition, and proper use of kitchen equipment. Students explore culinary-related careers (½ year – ½ credit) 9, 10, 11 & 12.

CULINARY ARTS 2

FFD501 

Students build upon the foundations of Culinary I in units of study including fruits/vegetables, meats, seafood and poultry, soups & sauces, grains, pasta, herbs & spices. Students review safety/sanitation, knife skills, and have the opportunity to become ServSafe certified. Students will work toward building culinary and employability skills to prepare for advanced courses and the workplace. Prerequisite: FFD201 or FFB301 (½ year – ½ credit) 10, 11 & 12.

DIGITAL ILLUSTRATION

ADR701

Students explore digital art making through a variety of techniques, including digital painting and drawing, digital collage through scanning and photography, and manipulation of text. Students use Adobe Photoshop and Adobe Illustrator to create art and narrate; students explore character development and digital aesthetics in graphic novels and comics. Studio fee, Prerequisite: (one of the following) ADR601, ADR661 or ADR664. (½ year – ½ credit) 10, 11 & 12.

DIGITAL MEDIA 1

IVP501

This course is designed to provide students with the basic knowledge and skills necessary to tell stories and produce digital content for various multimedia platforms (social media, traditional broadcast, web). This hands-on course is designed to teach students basic techniques for video, audio, lighting, graphics, and non-linear editing. Students will be introduced to several production environments including a television studio, live streaming, and careers in multimedia, marketing, public relations, and social media content specialists. Projects are deadline-driven and take place in the field, as assigned. Outside time of class is required. Courses may be repeated for credit (½ year – ½ credit) 9, 10, 11 & 12.

DIGITAL MEDIA 2

IVP601

Students will continue to develop and strengthen the skills needed for a career in the technical world of digital storytelling and broadcasting. Advanced production techniques further reinforce and strengthen the skills learned in Digital Media 1, to create dynamic digital content for various multimedia platforms (social media, traditional broadcast, web). This hands-on course will introduce additional tools and skillsets for producing digital content preparing students for a career in digital communications.  Students will continue their work in the television studio, and event live streaming. Projects are deadline-driven and take place in the field, as assigned. Outside time of class is required. Students may take the course for credit to advance their project depth and skills. Prerequisite:  Digital Media 1 or Journalism  Prerequisite: IVP501 or EJN301(full year – 1 credit) 10, 11 & 12.

DIGITAL PHOTOGRAPHY 1

AGP201 

Students explore fine arts digital photography by learning about composition, camera control, light and subject matter. Students gain experience using point-and-shoot cameras, DSLR cameras, and image manipulation in the digital darkroom using Adobe Photoshop, and students build a digital and print portfolio. Studio fee (½ year – ½ credit) 9, 10, 11 & 12.

DIGITAL PHOTOGRAPHY 2

AGP401 

Students begin to develop a style and voice as they strengthen and expand their skill and knowledge of the process of producing fine art digital photo-graphs. Students further explore the camera and lighting control and develop topics, passions, and independent ideas to create artwork. Students learn Photoshop and other digital presentation formats as they continue to build their digital and print portfolios. Studio fee, Prerequisite: AGP201 (full year – 1 credit)
10, 11 & 12.

DNA SCIENCE

SBT604 

In this laboratory-centered course, students explore the different techniques and equipment used in forensic science, disease detection, agriculture, bioinformatics, anthropology, and the pharmaceutical industry, with special emphasis upon DNA and genetics (½ year – ½ credit) 11 & 12.

ENGINEERING DESIGN 1 

VED201

Students learn the fundamentals of making and using technical drawings using AutoCAD. Students learn about geometric construction, orthographic representation, isometric drawing, dimensions, and tolerances. Students also learn how to create 3D objects using 3D printers. Strong foundations in algebra are highly recommended for success in this course. (½ year – ½ credit) 9, 10, 11 & 12.

ENGINEERING DESIGN 2 (T)

VED601 

Students expand upon technical drawing concepts using AutoCAD for two-dimensional and 3D solid modeling applications. Students explore additional software tools used in the industry including Solidworks and Chief Architect. Students have the opportunity to earn college credit while engaging in real-life projects and develop teamwork, design and problem-solving skills. Strong foundations in algebra are highly recommended for success in this course. Prerequisite: VED201 (full year, 1 credit) 10, 11 & 12.

Three Rives Community College equivalent course:
CAD K106/107: Computer Aided Drafting (3 credits)
ENGINEERING DESIGN 3 & ARCHITECTURE
VED754
 
Students simulate the occupations of an architect, interior designer and landscape engineer by creating a set of blueprints.  Using AutoCAD and Chief Architect software, students concur a virtual walk-through to incorporate interior details (kitchens, bathrooms, etc.)  Students develop drafting techniques and skills for employment in the manufacturing, engineering or architectural fields.  Students will have the opportunity to create 3d models and compete in a competition with high school and college students in the state. Prerequisite:  VED601 (full year, 1 credit) 10, 11, 12.
FINE ARTS 3-D DESIGN

ADE874

Fine Arts students explore three-dimensional design elements and principles through projects of original design. Students use a variety of techniques including carving, casting, construction and modeling and students work in metal, clay, wood, wire, paper, plaster, stone and found objects. Studio fee, Prerequisite: B in one of the following courses: ADR664, ADR601, ADE671, AMJ671, ACY661 or ADE771 (full year – 1 credit) 11 & 12.

FORENSIC SCIENCE

SFS651 

Students apply physical, and life science concepts learned in previous science courses in modern-day criminology and laboratory techniques to solve hypo-thetical criminal scenarios (½  year  –  ½  credit) 11 & 12.

FUNCTIONS

MFC953 

Students review and extend Algebra 2 concepts with a focus on quadratic, polynomial, rational, exponential, logarithmic, and radical functions. Prerequisites: C- in MAL654 or B in MAL873 and teacher recommendation (½ year/first semester – ½ credit) 12.

GOING GREEN

SGG001

Students increase awareness of their daily impact on the environment and learn basic “green” strategies to decrease their environmental footprint upon Earth (½ year – ½ credit) 9, 10 & 11.

GRAPHIC DESIGN 1

AGA201

Students learn basic design development using com-puters and various traditional art materials. Students prepare for the demands of the graphic designer using Photoshop and Illustrator and develop the skills of the visual communicator as they begin to build a portfolio. Studio fee (½ year – ½ credit) 9, 10, 11 & 12.

GRAPHIC DESIGN 2

AGA651 

Students continue to develop skills using basic design principles and color theory as they create projects like posters, photographic imaging, invitations, and text, etc., using PowerPoint, Photoshop, Illustrator and InDesign. Students develop and present a portfolio at the end of the year. Studio fee, Prerequisite: AGA201 (full year – 1 credit) 10, 11 & 12.

HONORS ACCOUNTING

BAC655 

Students learn the principles of Accounting 1 and 2 in this fast-paced, honors course. Students use an internet-based electronic workbook, and home internet access is highly recommended. Prerequisite: B- in MAL654 or accounting teacher approval (full year – 1 credit) 10, 11 & 12.

HONORS ALGEBRA 1

MAL005

Students develop skills in basic and beginning algebraic functions, solving and graphing equations, inequalities, and systems of equations, and apply these skills to solve real-world problems. This course is recommended for 9th-graders who have taken 8th-grade mathematics and who intend to follow a college preparatory mathematics sequence including Principles of Geometry and Algebra and Algebra 2 (full year – 1 credit). All ninth-grade mathematics courses require a scientific calculator (TI-30XIIS preferred).

HONORS ALGEBRA 2 & TRIGONOMETRY

MAL585 

At an in-depth and accelerated pace, students develop advanced algebra skills through the study functions and their graphs, quadratic, polynomial, exponential and logarithmic equations, rational and radical expressions, exponents/powers, as well as, an introduction to trigonometry. Prerequisite: Current mathematics teacher’s approval (full year – 1 credit) 10, 11 & 12.

HONORS ANATOMY & PHYSIOLOGY (E)

SHB805 

In this rigorous college-level course, students engage in a more thorough study of the regions, structure, and function of the human body with an emphasis on tissue organization and organ systems. Students complete laboratory exercises involving microscopy of tissues, dissection of Felis domesticus, and investigations of contemporary scientific research. Students complete summer coursework (full year – 1 credit) 11 & 12.

ECSU equivalent course: Human Biology, Lecture & Lab (4 credits)

HONORS ASTRONOMY (E)

SAY685

In this rigorous college-level course, students study the ever-changing universe while exploring galactic, stellar and planetary formation; investigate the relationships among math, physics, and astronomy; and study the history of astronomy.  Prerequisite: B or better in Honors Integrated Science and/or Recommendation from current science teacher (½ year –½ credit) 10, 11 & 12.

ECSU equivalent course: Descriptive Astronomy w/Lab (4 credits)

HONORS BIOLOGY

SBY075 

Honors students undertake a more rigorous study of the essential biological concepts with an emphasis on biological chemistry, structure and function and energy transformations at all levels of organization (cellular, individual, and ecosystem). Students participate in extensive laboratory work. Prerequisites: 9th-grade teacher approval (full year – 1 credit) 10.

HONORS CALCULUS

MIC955 

At an in-depth and accelerated pace, students will strengthen their understanding of functions in preparation for the process of differentiation and integration. Calculus concepts explored include limits and continuity, derivatives, anti-derivatives, and application of derivatives.   Prerequisite: B in MFS854 or MCA855 and current mathematics teacher’s approval (full year – 1 credit) 12.

HONORS CHEMISTRY

SCH805 

Students undertake a more rigorous and fast-paced study of the nature and Interactions of matter.  Topics include atomic structure, matter, chemical formulas, bonding, reactions, thermochemistry, the mole, stoichiometry, gas laws, solutions, and acids and bases. Prerequisite: B or higher in Algebra I (full year – 1 credit) 11 & 12.

HONORS COMPUTER SCIENCE 2

MCC875 

Students continue to develop problem-solving abilities with JAVA (object-oriented programming language). Prerequisite: MCC551 and teacher recommendation. (Does not meet the mathematics graduation require-ment.) (full year – 1 credit) 10, 11 & 12.

HONORS ECONOMICS (E)

HEC905 

Students learn about microeconomics by studying the relationship among scarcity, opportunity, cost, and supply and demand, and individual consumer and firm behavior. Students learn about macroeconomics by studying the economy as a whole, and by examining unemployment, productivity, inflation, trade, and development (full year – 1 credit) 11 & 12.

ECSU equivalent course ECO100: Political Economy of Social Issues (3 credits)

HONORS INDEPENDENT RESEARCH

SIR385 

Before enrollment, students submit a written plan of study for independent research for Science Department Head approval and gain approval of a science faculty member to serve as a mentor. Students may enter the Connecticut Science Fair and comply with all regulations. Prerequisite: Science Department Head approval (full year – 1 credit) 9, 10, 11 & 12.

HONORS INTEGRATED SCIENCE

SIS005 

Through scientific experimentation, research and discussion, students explore a wide range of topics from the origins of the universe to present day conditions that support the diversity of life on Earth. Recom-mended for highly motivated students whose score on the HSPT indicates a level of proficiency in computing, reasoning, and reading skills to be successful in grade 9 honors-level coursework (full year – 1 credit).

HONORS MARINE BIOLOGY

SMB675

In this honors level class students study organisms from the major marine phyla and marine ecosystems with emphasis on organisms from Long Island Sound and the New England coast. Students learn how organisms interact with their environment and study man’s environmental impact, including fisheries and aquaculture. Field trips to local marine environments are part of the class (full year – 1 credit) 10, 11 & 12.

HONORS PLANE GEOMETRY/STATISTICS

MGS555 

At an in-depth level and accelerated pace, students study lines, planes, angles, triangles, circles, and polygons and learn about coordinates, three-dimensional geometry, probability, statistics and data analysis. Prerequisite: Honors Algebra 1 and current mathematics teacher’s approval; (half year – 0.5 credits) 10, 11 & 12. 

HONORS PRECALCULUS

MCA855 

At an in-depth and accelerated pace students prepare for Calculus by deepening their understanding of Algebra topics ranging from polynomials, systems of equations, sequences, trigonometry concepts, and inverse, exponential, logarithmic and trigonometric functions. Prerequisite: B+ in MAL585 and current mathematics teacher’s approval (full year – 1 credit) 10, 11 & 12.

HONORS PRINCIPLES OF GEOMETRY & ALGEBRA

MGS605

Students will reinforce and build on their Algebra skills through their study of foundational Geometry topics at an in depth, accelerated pace. Topics include the study of points, and planes as they relate to 2-dimensional and 3-dimensional objects, including area and volume. Students also study topics related to probability, statistics, and data analysis. Prerequisite: MAL004 and teacher recommendation (full year – 1 credit) 9, 10, 11 & 12.

INTEGRATED MATH 1 (ML)

GMI603 

ML students begin a study of the integration of traditional Algebra 1 and Geometry in this first of a two-year sequence to learn about mathematical operations, algebraic equations and inequalities relating to the foundational topics of geometry, including lines, angle pairs, area, congruent figures, and similar figures. Students continue to gain language skills through speaking, listening, reading, and writing. Prerequisite: Placement test or GMP503 and teacher recommendation (full year – 1 credit) 9, 10, 11 & 12.

Integrated Mathematics 3

MIT623

Integrated Math 3 completes the three-course sequence of Integrated Mathematics and is designed to further explore the principles introduced in Integrated Math 1 and Integrated Math 2. This course brings together knowledge acquired in the previous two courses and uses it as a bridge to expand into more complex territories of algebra, geometry, statistics and probability. Prerequisite: MIT613 and teacher recommendation (full year - 1 credit) 11, 12.

INTEGRATED MATH II (ML)

GMI613 

ML students continue to study the integration of traditional Algebra 1 and Geometry with emphasis upon functions and their relationship to linear and exponential functions. Students review algebraic equations as they relate to polygons, surface area and volume, and probability, statistics and data analysis. Students continue to gain language skills through speaking, listening, reading, and writing. Prerequisite: Placement test or GMI603 and teacher recommendation (full year – 1 credit) 9, 10, 11 & 12.

INTEGRATED SCIENCE

SIS004 INTEGRATED SCIENCE

Through scientific experimentation, research and dis-cussion, students explore a wide range of topics from the origins of the universe to present day conditions that support the diversity of life on Earth (full year –1 credit).

INTEGRATED SCIENCE (ML)

GSI301

Intermediate/advanced ML students focus upon scientific experimentation, research, and discussion, exploring a wide range of topics from the origins of the universe to present-day conditions that support the diversity of life on Earth (full year – 1 credit) 9.

INTERNATIONAL CUISINES

FWF611 

Students explore various cultural groups and learn about cooking techniques and food traditions from around the globe. Students immerse themselves in the tradition and folklore of different cultures by preparing dishes from Mexico, France, Italy, India and more. Prerequisite: FFD201 or FFB301 (½ year – ½ credit) 10, 11 & 12.

INTRODUCTION TO AP/UCONN ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE

SES485

Students prepare for AP Environmental Science by studying ecosystem ecology, human populations, biomes, biodiversity, and conservation, and by participating in hands-on laboratory investigations and fieldwork. Emphasis is placed upon the skills to be successful in an AP course (½ year – ½ credit) 9, 10 & 11.

INTRODUCTION TO ENGINEERING

VEN704 

Students delve into the engineering design process and explore different engineering fields. Using industry standard 3D modeling software, students create, problem solve and investigate engineering principles. Hands-on projects including solar race cars, and a bridge design and build simulation reinforces engineering concepts (½ year – ½ credit) 10, 11 & 12.

INTRODUCTION TO MANUFACTURING (T)

VIM651 

Students explore the changing high-tech, innovative nature of advanced manufacturing with emphasis upon manufacturing systems & processes, safety, materials, production and career paths. Students create everyday products and prototypes with CNC machines, 3D printers and a variety of materials (metals, woods, plastic). Students can earn college credit and entry into the  (YMPI) Youth Manufacturing Program Initiative (½ year – ½ credit) 11 & 12.

Three Rives Community College equivalent course:
Manufacturing Process (3 credits)
INTRODUCTION TO MARKETING

BMK401 

Students learn marketing foundations and apply principles of the marketing mix, research, and branding in this hands-on course. On-campus and community challenges provide authentic experiences for students to apply their knowledge. Students develop an awareness of career opportunities and current trends in the industry (½ year – ½ credit) 10, 11 & 12.

INTRODUCTION TO PSYCHOLOGY

HPS804 

To prepare for college-level psychology courses, students study human thought processes and behaviors, noted psychologists and psychiatrists, research methods, brain studies, motivation, states of consciousness, intelligence and creativity, stages of human development, personality theories, gender issues and relationships, psychological disorders and therapies (full year – 1 credit) 12.

INTRODUCTION TO TRADITIONAL PHOTOGRAPHY

APC401 

Students learn the foundations and basic elements of using a traditional camera and of composing, developing, and producing images using photo-graphic media. Images are black and white and created using the darkroom. Studio fee (½ year – ½ credit) 9, 10, 11 & 12.

INTRODUCTION TO UCONN CHEMISTRY

SCH485 

Students prepare for UConn Chemistry (SCH876) by emphasizing problem-solving and application of basic chemistry principles in this honors level class. Students seriously considering taking UConn Chemistry must take this class. Prerequisites: B or higher in Algebra 1 (½ year – ½ credit) 10, 11 & 12.

JEWELRY & METALSMITHING

AMY671

Students learn the basics of contemporary jewelry design and fabrication through metalsmithing. Students learn metalsmithing techniques including sawing/piercing, soldering, cold connection, stone setting, and chain making.  Students create several finished wearable pieces. Studio fee and purchase of additional materials (½ year – ½ credit) 9, 10, 11 & 12.

JEWELRY & METALSMITHING 1

AMJ671

Students explore the metals medium and develop strong skills in metalsmithing, a working knowledge of contemporary jewelry design (principles, artists, and designers), and fabrication techniques including sawing, soldering, cold connection, finishing, forming and stone setting. Students create several finished wearable pieces. Studio fee and purchase of addi-tional materials (full year – 1 credit) 9, 10, 11 & 12.

JEWELRY & METALSMITHING 2

AMJ771 

Students delve deeper into the art of advanced three-dimensional jewelry and metalsmithing and learn more complex skills including hollow form, advanced stone setting, and enameling with an increased focus upon the complexity of design, construction, and craftsmanship. Students begin to explore creating utilitarian and sculptural artwork in pewter. The student art journal plays an important role in this course. Studio fee and purchase of additional materials, Prerequisite: Successful completion of AMJ671 and instructor permission (full year – 1 credit) 10, 11 & 12.

JEWELRY & METALSMITHING 3

AMJ871

Students continue to explore and refine jewelry and metalsmithing skills and techniques and learn more challenging techniques including cloisonné enameling and advanced stone setting. Students increase the complexity of production, research, and craftsmanship. Studio fee and purchase of additional materials, Prerequisite: Successful completion of AMJ771 and instructor permission (full year – 1 credit) 11 & 12.

JEWELRY & METALSMITHING 4

AMJ971

Under faculty guidance, students participate in individual research and design to continue to build strong design skills and craftsmanship in metal and/or to prepare a portfolio of work. Students produce work of increasing complexity, research, and craftsmanship. Students have the opportunity to work as studio assistants. Studio fee and purchase of additional materials, Prerequisite: Successful completion of AMJ871 and instructor permission (full year – 1 credit) 12.

KINESIOLOGY

SKS804

Students study human movement to prepare for college-level study in a range of health and human movement fields including exercise physiology, biomechanics, motor development, sports medicine, athletic training, and physical therapy. Using problem-based learning, students integrate knowledge of biological, physical, and chemical factors to analyze the human body’s response to exercise (full year – 1 credit) 11 & 12.

LIFE SCIENCE (ML)

GSL201 

ML students beginning to develop English and literacy learn basic life science terminology (plants, animals, food webs, biomes, and ecosystems) and follow an integrated science curriculum focusing on Earth as a living system. Students continue to gain language skills through speaking, listening, reading, and writing (full year – 1 credit) 9, 10, 11 & 12.

MARINE BIOLOGY

SMB651 

Students learn about the various components of marine biology via marine ecosystems and marine species. Topics include the history of marine biology, invertebrates using taxonomy, vertebrates, and finally man’s impact on the marine environment and species. Students have opportunities for field studies with Project Oceanology (½ year – ½ credit) 10, 11 & 12.

MARINE TRADES 1/BOATING

IRB311

With multiple hands-on learning opportunities, students study recreational boating including nautical navigation, recreational water activities, weather effects upon boating, and safe boating techniques. In on-the-water training activities, students practice their boating skills and gain insights into career opportunities in the maritime industry. Students have the option to take the CT DEEP Safe Boating examination and become eligible for a CT Safe Boating Certificate
(½ year – ½ credit) 9, 10, 11 & 12.

MATH FOR CAREER & COLLEGE READINESS

MCR753 

Students focus upon number systems, functions and their graphs, and modeling relationships between quantities using functions, equations and expressions with integer exponents and radicals, linear equations, and systems of linear equations. Students use Pythagorean Theorem and geometrical formulas to solve real-world problems. Prerequisites: C- in MAL873 or B+ in MIT623 and teacher recommendation. Not appropriate for students who have earned a C or bet-ter in MAL654 (½ year/second semester – ½ credit) 12.

MICROBES & DISEASE

SMD601

Students gain in-depth knowledge of basic biological and clinical aspects of viral and bacterial pathogens and the diseases they cause by studying principles of epidemiology, disease detection, and prevention, chain of infection and human immunology. Students learn laboratory procedures and principles vital for entry into various health care fields (½ year - ½ credit) 11 & 12.

MODELING WITH MATHEMATICS

MMG753 

Students apply their knowledge and critical thinking to develop mathematical models to solve real-world problems. Topics include linear models, systems of linear equations and inequalities, quadratic models, and natural growth models. A graphing calculator is required.  Prerequisites: C- in MAL873 or B- in MIT623. Not appropriate for students who have taken MAL 654 (½ year/first semester – ½ credit) 12.

MUSIC TECH 2

TMT301

Students continue to study digital recording, music notation software and MIDI sequencing software. Prerequisite: TMT201 or instructor approval (½ year – ½ credit) 10, 11 & 12.

MUSIC TECHNOLOGY 1

TMT201 

Students learn the basics of digital recording, music notation software and MIDI sequencing software. No musical or technology experience needed (½ year – ½ credit) 9, 10, 11 & 12.

MUSIC TECHNOLOGY 3

TMT401 

Students learn more advanced techniques using digital recording, music notation software and MIDI sequencing software. Students use the Logic X and ProTools software. Prerequisite: TMT301 or instructor approval (½ year – ½ credit) 10, 11 & 12.

PERSONAL FINANCE

BPF501 

Students develop a foundational understanding of the importance of making informed financial decisions leading to financial independence by exploring the essentials of budgeting, banking, credit, identity theft, insurance, and taxes. Students complete a post-high school budget to align spending habits with expected income (½ year – ½ credit) 10, 11 & 12.

PHYSICAL SCIENCE (ML)

GPS501 

ML students study a blend of the physical sciences (chemistry and physics) in a problem-based course. Students continue to gain language skills through speaking, listening, reading, and writing (full year – 1 credit) 11 & 12.

PHYSICS

SPY904 

Students study the mechanics and theory behind the interactions of solids, liquids, and gases, including motion, vector analysis, dynamics, momentum, work, energy, simple machines, sound, light, mirrors and lenses. Students are required to design, build, and test two STEM projects related to mechanics. Prerequisite: B or higher in Algebra 2 strongly recommended (full year – 1 credit) 11 & 12.

PLANE GEOMETRY

MGE554 

Students study lines, planes, angles, triangles, circles and polygons and work with coordinates, three-dimensional geometry, probability, statistics, and data analysis. Prerequisite: C+ or higher in MAL004 or MAL005 and teacher recommendation (full year – 1 credit) 10, 11 & 12.

PRE-ALGEBRA (ML)

GMP503 

ML students review and strengthen arithmetic skills, learn introductory algebra concepts, including working with signed numbers and variables, and solve simple equations. Students continue to gain language skills through speaking, listening, reading, and writing. Prerequisite: Placement test or teacher or counselor recommendation (full year – 1 credit) 9, 10, 11 & 12.

PRECALCULUS

MFS854 

Students prepare for the study of calculus and strengthen their conceptual understanding of problems and mathematical reasoning in solving problems by studying a combination of trigonometric, geometric and algebraic techniques. Prerequisite: MAL585 or B in MAL654 and teacher recommendation (full year – 1 credit) 10, 11 & 12.

PREHISTORIC EARTH & PALEONTOLOGY

SPE001 

Students undertake an in-depth analysis of geological processes that shaped the earth and led to the fossilization of organisms during the Mesozoic Era. Students study plate tectonics, evolution, geology, and paleontology through independent assignments, laboratory activities and research projects (½ year – ½ credit) 9, 10 & 11.

PRINCIPLES OF GEOMETRY & ALGEBRA

MGS604

Students will reinforce and build on their Algebra skills through their study of foundational Geometry topics. Topics include the study of points, and planes as they relate to 2-dimensional and 3-dimensional objects, including area and volume. Students also study topics related to probability, statistics, and data analysis. Prerequisite: MAL004 and teacher recommendation (full year – 1 credit) 10, 11 & 12.

PROBABILITY & STATISTICS THROUGH MODELING

MPS753

Students will study basic rules of probability and will be able to use them in modeling uncertainty in obtaining and recording data. They will be able to utilize graph-ical and numerical summaries of data and will apply the algebra, statistics, and probability principles in the context of sports and games. Prerequisites: B+ in MIT623 or B- in MAL873. Not appropriate for a student with a B- in MAL654 (½ year/both semesters – ½ credit) 12.

ROBOTICS ENGINEERING

VRE511 

Students explore one of the fastest growing industries in the world in a course that blends programming and engineering (mechanical, electrical) in hands-on activities and teamwork. Students enhance problem-solving skills by designing, building, and programming VEX robots to meet challenges and compete. Strong foundations in algebra are highly recommended for success in this course. (½ year – ½ credit) 10, 11 & 12.

SCULPTURE

ADE771 

Students explore three-dimensional design elements and principles of visual art through projects of original design using a variety of techniques and materials (including paper, clay, wire and found objects). Studio fee (½ year – ½ credit) 9, 10, 11 & 12.

SENIOR SEMINAR

ISM801 

Students planning on entering the workforce full-time directly out of high school or attend college part-time will gain essential tools to transition from high school to the world of work. The course is divided into six-week cycles focusing on financial independence, Microsoft Office skills and workplace readiness. Community partner and business involvement in networking, resume building and interviewing will prepare students for job interviews and employment. Prerequisite:  Students must be on track to graduate and in good standing with academics, behavior, and attendance (½ year – ½ credit) 12.

SPORTS & ENTERTAINMENT MANAGEMENT

BSE401

Students study management and marketing functions of the sports and entertainment industries. Using a sports management simulation, students explore the issues of the industry and formulate strategies to address them. Students develop employability skills by participating in class presentations and projects with local sports and entertainment organizations to extend classroom learning (½ year – ½ credit) 10, 11 & 12.

SPORTS SCIENCE

SS601

In this introductory course, students learn how the healthy human body works during exercise, and how sport and physical activity promote health and performance from a cellular to whole body perspective. Students gain a greater understanding of how the human body reacts to exercise, training, different environments and many other stimuli (½ year - ½ credit) 11 & 12.

STATISTICS

MSA804 

Students learn about the major concepts and tools for collecting, analyzing, and drawing conclusions from data with an emphasis on experiments and applications. Prerequisite: C+ in MAL654 or MAL585, or A- in MAL873 and teacher recommendation (full year – 1 credit) 12.

TOPICS IN HEALTH & MEDICINE

SHM701 

Students learn about, discuss, and debate important issues surrounding human health and medicine.  Topics include pharmacology, diet and exercise, the history of medicine, disease and diagnosis, health insurance and health education. Students also explore different career options in Health and Medicine (½ year – ½ credit) 9, 10, 11 & 12.

TRADITIONAL PHOTOGRAPHY 1

APC701 

Students learn the basic elements of composing, developing, and producing a body of work using photographic media and explore in-depth a variety of materials and techniques to refine their skills. Students explore darkroom techniques and processes to develop technical and creative skills. Studio fee (full year – 1 credit) 9, 10, 11 & 12. 

TRADITIONAL PHOTOGRAPHY 2

APC771 

Students continue to develop creative and technical aspects of black and white photography, including a more sophisticated grasp of exposure, the processing of film, alternative photography, and discussion of fine printmaking. Studio fee, Prerequisite: APC401 (full year – 1 credit) 10, 11 & 12.

TRIGONOMETRY

MTR953 

Students study the properties of triangles and trigonometric functions focusing upon the six basic trigonometric functions, their inverses, and their graphs from a practical and theoretical point of view. Prerequisites: C- in MAL654 or B in MAL873 and teacher recommendation (½ year/second semester – ½ credit) 12.

UCONN CHEMISTRY (U)

SCH876 

Students study general chemistry in depth at the college level and perform required after-school lab work and tests. UConn supplies tests, labs, online homework, and book work. Students complete summer coursework. Prerequisite: B or higher in SCH485, SCH804, or SCH805 (full year – 1.25 credits) 11 & 12.

UConn equivalent course:
General Chemistry (4 credits)
General Chemistry (4 credits)
UCONN INTRODUCTION TO OCEANOGRAPHY (U)

SMS786

In this college-level course, students learn about the processes governing the world’s oceans, including chemical, geological, physical, and biological oceanography. Students focus on the interactions and interrelationships contributing to the stability and the variability of the marine environment. This is a lab-based class with labs conducted during class periods. Students have opportunities for field studies with Project Oceanology (full year – 1 credit) 11 & 12.

UConn equivalent course: Intro to Oceanography w/Lab (4 credits)

UCONN PHYSICS 1 (U)

SPY956 

Students study Newtonian mechanics, work, energy, heat, fluids, mechanical waves and sound in this algebra-based physics course. This course is UConn PHYS1201Q (first-semester course in college physics) presented over a full year. Prerequisite: B or higher in Algebra 2 strongly recommended (full year – 1 credit) 11 & 12.

UConn equivalent course: General Physics I (4 credits)

UNIFIED FOODS

FFD401 

Students work in partnership with peers with special needs in a cooperative learning environment to learn essential culinary skills and prepare Brickview meals. Students focus upon the proper use of equipment, safety, and sanitation, and learn preparation techniques for a variety of foods. Students learn to make informed decisions about nutrition, food selection, menu planning and purchasing. (½ year – ½ credit) 9, 10, 11 & 12.

UNIFIED GRAPHICS

AGA501 

Students work in partnership with peers with special needs in a technology-rich cooperative learning environment to gain valuable experience while creat-ing personal works of art and building technology skills. No art experience necessary. Studio fee (½ year – ½ credit) 10, 11 & 12.

UNIFIED ZOOLOGY

SOC631 

Students work in partnership with peers with special needs in a cooperative learning environment to study a general overview of the animal kingdoms, including evolution, classification, morphology, and ecology. Students handle and care for live animals (½ year – ½ credit) 11 & 12.

VETERINARY SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY

SSV601 

Students study the underlying principles of animal medicine, including basic anatomy and physiology, and learn medical practices and procedures, including pet first aid (½ year – ½ credit) 10, 11 & 12.

WOOD TECHNOLOGY 1

VWT201 

In this introductory woodworking course, students learn techniques and procedures and build foundational skills with hand and limited power tools. Students learn about safety, measurements/mathematics application, proper tool use, and careers in woodworking and related fields. Minimal project fee may be required (½ year – ½ credit) 9, 10, 11 & 12.

WOOD TECHNOLOGY 2

VWT651 

Students further develop woodworking knowledge and skills in individual and team-based projects using power tools and different wood species. Students continue to learn about the foundations of safety, measurements/mathematics application, and proper tool use. Students visit with experts in the field and develop further insight into career paths. Project fee may be required. Prerequisite: VWW201 (½ year – ½ credit) 10, 11 & 12.

YEARBOOK PRODUCTION

IYP501 

Students produce the yearbook by working in an integrated program of print journalism, photography, layout and design, and marketing and sales in a full year course.  You will learn desktop publishing and basic photoshop.  This is a deadline-driven class. This course may be taken more than once (full year – 1 elective credit) 10, 11 & 12.

ZOOLOGY

SOC601 

Students learn about the animal kingdom throughout the world with emphasis upon local species and their interactions with the environment. Topics include evolution, classification, genetics, and ecology. Many hands-on activities support learning throughout the course (½ year - ½ credit) 11 & 12.